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All Da King's Men

The No-Information Voter

By David King Published: March 10, 2013

A few months ago, I read this:

"I would be willing to wager that if an average citizen of Athens of 1,000 BC were to appear suddenly among us, he or she would be among the brightest and most intellectually alive of our colleagues and companions," Crabtree wrote in a study that appeared in Trends in Genetics. "I would also guess that he or she would be among the most emotionally stable of our friends and colleagues."

I was skeptical that people today were dumber than the people of 3,000 years ago.

Then I read this:

Andreas Schleicher, special adviser on education at the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), says the US is now the only major economy in the world where the younger generation is not going to be better educated than the older.

That didn't really sound right to me either.

Then I read this:

New York State is No. 1 in per pupil spending in the country blowing $18,126 per student and New York City tops that by spending $19,000 per student..[but]...Nearly 80 percent of New York City high school graduates need to relearn basic skills before they can enter the City University’s community college system.

Yikes. That's pretty alarming. How can we spend so much money and STILL not educate our students ? Something is seriously amiss. Perhaps Bloomberg should ban illiteracy rather than 2-liter bottles of soda.

Finally, the Jimmy Kimmel show...

Hmmm. Maybe the Athenians WERE smarter.

WIth all the talk about [non-existent] voter suppression in the last election cycle, perhaps the real voter suppression is this - for every vote cast by one of these no-information voters (they are too clueless to be called "low-information voters"), it cancels out, or suppresses, the vote of someone who made the effort to become informed about the issues. Instead of running public service announcements telling people to get out and vote, we should be telling them to learn the issues or STAY HOME. Going into a voting booth and checking a box doesn't make you a responsible citizen. Learning WHY you're checking the box makes you a responsible citizen. "I voted for [jor against] Obama because he's black" is not a valid reason to cast a vote.

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