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Final thoughts on LeBron

By Jason Lloyd Published: September 30, 2010

I am not going to pretend I know what it's like to grow up as a minority. I don't. I'm not going to say LeBron is wrong for feeling his race played into his treatment following the decision. I'm not going to say he is right, either.

The question posed by CNN's Soledad O'Brien was "Do you think there's a role that race plays in this?"

Maverick Carter answered that it "definitely played a role in some of the stuff coming out of the media, things that were written."

I disagree with that. It's my opinion that the critical articles written about James pertained strictly to his Game 5 performance against Boston and the way he chose to leave town. That is what most people around here take exception to, regardless of their color.

But James answered O'Brien's question with "I think so at times. It's always, you know, a race factor."

James didn't mention media coverage. Now I disagree that it's ALWAYS a race factor in life. As I pointed out yesterday, some of James' harshest critics -- Michael Jordan, Charles Barkley and Orlando Magic GM Otis Smith -- are all African American. Certainly it isn't a race issue with them.

But did race play a role at all in this? I don't know and frankly, neither do you.

When LeBron James created a Twitter account over the summer, he opened himself up to the world. Did he receive racial insults from angry fans? I wouldn't doubt it. In this era where technology has made sports stars more accessible to the public than ever before, would it really be that surprising if an angry mob unleashed some racial vitriol at James? Would you then understand where he's coming from by saying race played a role in this?

Listen, I'm not saying it did and I'm not saying it didn't. I'm not saying James did receive racial threats and I'm not saying he didn't. I'm merely pointing out the fact that it wouldn't be all that surprising, sadly, if he was the subject of racial slurs.

Unfortunately, just because most Americans can get angry and express their views without bringing race into the equation, that doesn't mean all of us can.

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