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Ohio Utica Shale

Study says state disclosure, oversight laws are inadequate

By Bob Downing Published: July 9, 2012
In a report reelased today, OMBG Watch said that state oversight laws on disclosure of the chemicals used in natural gas hydrauloic fracturing or farcking need to be overhauled.
 
In addition, the disclosure of chemical sused in fracking are spotty and inadequate, the group said.
 
"Public officials in state government are struggling to find a way to protect water supplies and public health in the wake of the rapid expansion of natural gas drilling and extraction. They haven’t gotten it right yet," said Katherine McFate, president of OMB Watch.
 
"Some of the chemicals used in natural gas fracking have been linked to serious health problems, including cancer and kidney, liver, and neurological damage, so it is imperative that local water supplies be carefully monitored and protected," she said.
 
The report, The Right to Know, the Responsibility to Protect: State Actions Are Inadequate to Ensure Effective Disclosure of the Chemicals Used in Natural Gas Fracking, examines state disclosure laws and rules and identifies the gap between effective policy and existing practice.
The analysis is especially timely given the ongoing boom in natural gas extraction: almost half a million natural gas wells are operating in at least 30 states, and more are planned.
 
The report asserts that an effective chemical disclosure policy should contain the following elements:
  • Before getting drilling permits, owners and operators should gather baseline information on nearby water sources and water and air quality.
  • Information on the chemicals used in fracking should be collected from drilling companies, well operators, and manufacturers and should include specific information on the unique chemical identification numbers, concentrations, and the quantity of the chemicals used.
  • States should have clear guidelines limiting "trade secrets" exemptions from disclosure laws to prevent companies from invoking this loophole to avoid disclosure.
  • Information about the chemicals used at each individual well where fracking occurs should be posted on a public website in a way that allows users to easily search, sort, and download data by chemicals used, companies involved, and well location.
"Some states, like Colorado, do a better job than others of making chemical information available to the public, but no state is requiring enough upfront collection of baseline data and ongoing monitoring to adequately protect local water supplies and public health. Citizens need to have adequate information to evaluate the potential risks and rewards of allowing natural gas fracking in their communities," said Sean Moulton, director of information policy at OMB Watch and an author of the report.
 
Go here to find the full report: www.ombwatch.org/naturalgasfrackingdisclosure.
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