All CATEGORIES
☰ Menu
The HeldenFiles Online

Looking Ahead: TCM Sets "31 Days" Lineup, Trivia Theme

By admin Published: November 11, 2010

Turner Classic Movies (TCM) will offer trivia-tied lineups during the 2011 "31 Days of Oscar" telecasts, with categories like movies that won Best Picture but no other Oscars; actresses nominated for playing Oscar nominees; Best Picture nominees that were remakes, actors who directed themselves in Oscar-nominated roles, and more. The complete list as it now stands is after the jump.

Also, says TCM: The 2011 edition will feature several high-profile films making their debuts on TCM, including three Best Picture winners: Cavalcade (1933), Amadeus (1984) and Forrest Gump (1994). The month also includes the TCM debuts of the blockbusters Pretty Woman (1990) and Thelma & Louise (1991), as well as outstanding dramas like Hugh Hudson’s Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes (1984), Hector Babenco’s Kiss of the Spider Woman (1985), Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing (1989) and Michael Mann’s Ali (2001).

Several excellent actress showcases are planned for TCM for the first time, including Janet Gaynor in Street Angel (1928), Loretta Young in The Men in Her Life (1941), Ingrid Bergman in Joan of Arc (1948) and The Inn of the Sixth Happiness (1958), Marilyn Monroe in Bus Stop (1956), Julie Andrews in Star! (1968) and Cathy Burns in Last Summer (1969). Also, such international classics as Hiroshi Teshigahara’s Woman in the Dunes (1964), Constantine Costa-Gavras’ Z (1969), Jean-Charles Tacchella’s Cousin, Cousine (1975), Jean-Paul Rappeneau’s Cyrano de Bergerac (1990) and Krzysztof Kieslowski’s Three Colors: Red (1994) will come to TCM for the first time.

And on to the lineup.
31 DAYS OF OSCAR
TRIVIA EDITION
Tuesday, Feb. 1 – Thursday, March 3, 2011

Tuesday, Feb. 1 (all times shown are Eastern)

The Right Direction

Director W.S. Van Dyke is the only director to have four films nominated for Oscars at the same ceremony.

6:00 a.m. Eskimo (1933) – nominated for Best Editing.

8:00 a.m. Hide-Out (1934) – nominated for Best Original Story.

9:30 a.m. Manhattan Melodrama (1934) – nominated for Best Original Story.

11:15 a.m. The Thin Man (1934) – nominated for Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Adaptation and Best Director.

Self-Made Men

Orson Welles, Charlie Chaplin and Laurence Olivier all directed themselves to Best Actor nominations.

1:00 p.m. Citizen Kane (1941) – Orson Welles

3:00 p.m. The Great Dictator (1940) – Charlie Chaplin

5:15 p.m. Richard III (1955) – Laurence Olivier

What a Character!

Charles Laughton, Robert Shaw and Richard Burton all scored Oscar nominations for playing King Henry VIII.

8:00 p.m. The Private Life of Henry VIII (1933) – Charles Laughton won for Best Actor.

10:00 p.m. A Man for All Seasons (1966) – Robert Shaw was nominated for Best Supporting Actor.

12:15 a.m. Anne of the Thousand Days (1969) – Richard Burton nominated for Best Actor.

Love at First Sight

These women were all nominated for performances in their film debuts.

2:45 a.m. Last Summer (1969) – Cathy Burns was nominated for Best Supporting Actress.

4:30 a.m. Anthony Adverse (1936) – Gale Sondergaard nominated for Best Supporting Actress.

Wednesday, Feb. 2

Love at First Sight (cont.)

7:00 a.m. The Great Waltz (1938) – Miliza Korjus nominated for Best Supporting Actress.

8:45 a.m. The Little Foxes (1941) – Teresa Wright and Patricia Collinge nominated for Best Supporting Actress.

11:00 a.m. Nicholas and Alexandra (1971) – Janet Suzman nominated for Best Actress.

2:15 p.m. The Heart is a Lonely Hunter (1968) – Sondra Locke nominated for Best Supporting Actress.

4:30 p.m. Lonelyhearts (1958) – Maureen Stapleton nominated for Best Supporting Actress.

6:15 p.m. The Moon is Blue (1953) – Maggie McNamara nominated for Best Actress.

Most Nominated Actor

Jack Nicholson has been nominated 12 times, more than any other actor.

8:00 p.m. The Last Detail (1973) – nominated for Best Actor.

10:00 p.m. Terms of Endearment (1983) – won for Best Supporting Actor.

12:30 a.m. Easy Rider (1969) – nominated for Best Actor.

2:15 a.m. Five Easy Pieces (1970) – nominated for Best Actor.

Husbands & Wives

Three times, a husband and wife have been nominated for performances in the same film. These are the three films.

4:15 a.m. The Guardsman (1931) – Alfred Lunt nominated for Best Actor and Lynne Fontanne nominated for Best Actress.

Thursday, Feb. 3

Husbands & Wives (cont.)

6:00 a.m. Witness for the Prosecution (1957) – Elsa Lanchester nominated for Best Actress and Charles Laughton nominated for Best Actor.

8:00 a.m. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966) – Elizabeth Taylor won for Best Actress and Richard Burton was nominated for Best Actor.

Four in One

Thirteen times a single film has been nominated in all four acting categories. Here are four examples.

10:30 a.m. Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner? (1967) – Katherine Hepburn won for Best Actress, Spencer Tracy nominated for Best Actor, Cecil Kellaway nominated for Best Supporting Actor, Beah Richards nominated for Best Supporting Actress.

12:30 p.m. Johnny Belinda (1948) – Jane Wyman won for Best Actress, Lew Ayres nominated for Best Actor, Agnes Moorehead nominated for Best Supporting Actress, Charles Bickford nominated for Best Supporting Actor.

2:30 p.m. For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943) – Katina Paxinou won for Best Supporting Actress, Gary Cooper nominated for Best Actor, Ingrid Bergman nominated for Best Actress, Akim Tamiroff nominated for Best Supporting Actor.

5:30 p.m. A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) – Vivien Leigh won for Best Actress, Karl Malden won for Best Supporting Actor, Kim Hunter won for Best Supporting Actress, Marlon Brando nominated for Best Actor.

1929-1930

TCM presents the five Best Picture nominees for the third Academy Awards, when sound began to dominate the industry.

8:00 p.m. The Love Parade (1929)

10:00 p.m. All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) – won for Best Picture.

12:30 a.m. The Big House (1930)

2:00 a.m. The Divorcee (1930)

3:30 a.m. Disraeli (1929)

Kerr Trouble

Deborah Kerr holds the record for most Best Actress nominations (six) without ever winning. TCM presents three of her nominated performances.

5:00 a.m. Edward, My Son (1949)

Friday, Feb. 4

Kerr Trouble (cont.)

7:00 a.m. Separate Tables (1958)

9:00 a.m. The Sundowners (1960)

Like Kissing Your Sister

Only twice in the history of the Oscars have acting awards ended in a tie, once for Best Actor and once for Best Actress.

11:30 a.m. The Champ (1931) – Wallace Beery won for Best Actor.

1:00 p.m. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1932) – Fredric March won for Best Actor.

2:45 p.m. The Lion in Winter (1968) – Katharine Hepburn won for Best Actress.

5:15 p.m. Funny Girl (1968) – Barbra Streisand won for Best Actress.

An All-Knighter

Several British knights have been nominated for Oscars for their performances.

8:00 p.m. The Heiress (1949) – Sir Ralph Richardson nominated for Best Supporting Actor after being knighted in 1947.

10:00 p.m. The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) – Sir Alec Guinness won for Best Actor before being knighted in 1959.

1:00 a.m. Ryan’s Daughter (1970) – Sir John Mills won for Best Supporting Actor before being knighted in 1976.

4:30 a.m. Mourning Becomes Electra (1947) – Sir Michael Redgrave was nominated for Best Actor before being knighted in 1959.

Saturday, Feb. 5

An All-Knighter (cont.)

7:15 a.m. Othello (1965) – Sir Laurence Olivier was nominated for Best Actor after being knighted in1948.

10:15 a.m. Becket (1964) – Sir John Guilgud was nominated for Best Supporting Actor after being knighted in 1953.

The Good Luck Charm

While actress and frequent extra Bess Flowers was never nominated for an Oscar herself, she holds the record for most appearances in Best Picture nominees, with 22. TCM presents some of those nominated films.

1:00 p.m. Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936)

3:00 p.m. One Hundred Men and a Girl (1937)

4:30 p.m. The Awful Truth (1937)

6:15 p.m. Father of the Bride (1950)

Real Men

Many Best Actor nominations have come from playing real-life characters.

8:00 p.m. Stand and Deliver (1988) – Edward James Olmos nominated for Best Actor for playing Jaime Escalante, a teacher in East Lost Angeles that motivated and inspired his students to succeed in math.

10:00 p.m. Gandhi (1982) – Ben Kingsley won for Best Actor for playing the Indian leader.

1:30 a.m. Ali (2001) – Will Smith nominated for Best Actor for playing three-time heavyweight champion Muhammad Ali.

4:30 a.m. Lust for Life (1956) – Kirk Douglas nominated for Best Actor for playing artist Vincent Van Gogh.

Sunday, Feb. 6

Real Men (cont.)

7:00 a.m. Conquest (1937) – Charles Boyer nominated for Best Actor for playing Napoleon Bonaparte.

9:00 a.m. Abe Lincoln in Illinois (1940) – Raymond Massey nominated for Best Actor for playing America’s 16th president.

11:00 a.m. The Jolson Story (1946) – Larry Parks nominated for Best Actor for playing the great actor/singer.

1:15 p.m. Birdman of Alcatraz (1962) – Burt Lancaster nominated for Best Actor for playing convict and bird lover Robert Stroud.

3:45 p.m. Viva Zapata! (1952) – Marlon Brando nominated for Best Actor for playing the Mexican revolutionary.

5:45 p.m. The Pride of the Yankees (1942) – Gary Cooper nominated for Best Actor for playing the baseball hero.

Retired Categories

A night of films that won in categories that are no longer awarded

8:00 p.m. Sunrise (1927) – won for Best Unique and Artistic Quality of Production.

10:00 p.m. Wings (1927) – won for Best Engineering Effects.

12:30 a.m. The House on 92nd Street (1945) – won for Best Story.

2:15 a.m. Viva Villa! (1934) – won for Best Assistant Director.

4:15 a.m. A Damsel in Distress (1937) – won for Best Dance Direction.

Monday, Feb. 7

All or Nothing

Although rare, there are films that received a Best Picture nomination, but no other nominations.

6:00 a.m. Here Comes the Navy (1934)

7:30 a.m. Trader Horn (1931)

10:00 a.m. The House of Rothschild (1934)

12:00 p.m. Libeled Lady (1936)

Picture Perfect

Leon Shamroy is tied for both the total number of nominations for Best Cinematography (18, tied with Charles B. Lang, Jr.) and wins in the category (four, tied with Joseph Ruttenberg). TCM presents some of his nominated films.

1:45 p.m. The Black Swan (1942) – won for Best Cinematography.

3:15 p.m. The Snows of Kilimanjaro (1952) – nominated for Best Cinematography.

5:15 p.m. South Pacific (1958) – nominated for Best Cinematography.

Playing Out the String

In the history of the Academy Awards, two women have been nominated for Best Actress five years in a row, Bette Davis and Greer Garson. Here is Greer Garson’s string of nominees:

8:00 p.m. Blossoms in the Dust (1941) – nominated for Best Actress.

10:00 p.m. Mrs. Miniver (1942) – won for Best Actress.

12:30 a.m. Madame Curie (1943) – nominated for Best Actress.

2:45 a.m. Mrs. Parkington (1944) – nominated for Best Actress.

5:00 a.m. The Valley of Decision (1945) – nominated for Best Actress.

Tuesday, Feb. 8

The Most Nominations…Without Winning

7:00 a.m. The Shoes of the Fisherman (1968) – Alex North holds the record for most Best Score nominations without winning, with 14.

9:45 a.m. Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954) – George Folsey holds the record for most Best Cinematography nominations without winning, with 13.

11:30 a.m. 2010 (1984) – Patricia Norris holds the record for most Best Costume Design nominations without winning, with five.

1:30 p.m. The Hanging Tree (1959) – Mack David holds the record for most Best Song nominations without winning, with eight.

3:30 p.m. On the Beach (1959) – Frederic Knudtson holds the record for most Best Editing nominations without winning, with six.

5:45 p.m. The Caine Mutiny (1954) – Stanley Kramer is tied with Pedro S. Berman as the producer with the most Best Picture nominations without winning, with six.

Winners in both Leading and Supporting Roles

Six actors and five actresses have won Oscars in both the leading and supporting categories. Below are some of those winning performances:

8:00 p.m. Gaslight (1944) – Ingrid Bergman won for Best Actress; she also won for Best Supporting Actress for 1974’s Murder on the Orient Express.

10:00 p.m. Kramer vs. Kramer (1979) – Meryl Streep won for Best Supporting Actress; she also won for Best Actress for 1982’s Sophie’s Choice.

12:00 a.m. Glory (1989) – Denzel Washington won for Best Supporting Actor; he also won for Best Actor for 2001’s Training Day.

2:15 a.m. Mister Roberts (1955) – Jack Lemmon won for Best Supporting Actor; he also won for Best Actor for 1973’s Save the Tiger.

Alien Invasions

While the Best Director Oscar has only gone to English-language films, several directors have been nominated for making films in other languages. TCM presents some imports nominated for Best Director.

4:30 a.m. Three Colors: Red (1994) – Krzysztof Kieslowski nominated for Best Director.

Wednesday, Feb. 9

Alien Invasions (cont.)

6:30 a.m. Woman in the Dunes (1964) – Hiroshi Teshigahara nominated for Best Director.

8:45 a.m. The Battle of Algiers (1967) – Gillo Pontecorvo nominated for Best Director.

11:00 a.m. Z (1969) – Constantine Costa-Gavras nominated for Best Director.

The Write Stuff

Among his numerous nominations and wins, Billy Wilder has been nominated in three different writing categories. Below are three of his nominated films, one from each of those categories.

1:30 p.m. Ball of Fire (1941) – nominated for Best Original Story.

3:30 p.m. A Foreign Affair (1948) – nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay.

5:30 p.m. The Fortune Cookie (1966) – nominated for Best Original Screenplay.

Memorable Oscar Moments

8:00 p.m. Come Back, Little Sheba (1952) – In the first year of television the Oscars, the large audience wasn’t necessarily a benefit for Best Actress winner Shirley Booth, who stumbled rushing up the steps to accept her award.

10:00 p.m. Cavalcade (1933) – In one of the more embarrassing moments in Oscar history, presenter Lloyd Bacon announced, “Come and get it, Frank” for the winner of the Best Director award, Frank Lloyd. But fellow nominee Frank Capra jumped up to head toward the stage to accept.

12:00 a.m. Whatever Happened to Baby Jane? (1962) – After Bette Davis was nominated for Best Actress, overlooked co-star Crawford offered to accept on behalf of any Best Actress winner who couldn’t attend the ceremony. When the absent Anne Bancroft won for The Miracle Worker, Crawford got her time in the spotlight.

Sweet Music

Sammy Cahn holds the record for most nominations as a songwriter, with 26. He won four times in the Best Song category. TCM presents some of the films for which he was nominated.

2:30 a.m. Some Came Running (1958) – nominated for Best Song.

5:00 a.m. Robin and the Seven Hoods (1964) – nominated for Best Song.

Thursday, Feb. 10

Sweet Music (cont.)

7:15 a.m. Rich, Young and Pretty (1951) – nominated for Best Song.

9:00 a.m. Because You’re Mine (1952) – nominated for Best Song.

11:00 a.m. Tonight and Every Night (1945) – nominated for Best Song.

12:45 p.m. Romance on the High Seas (1948) – nominated for Best Song.

2:30 p.m. Anchors Aweigh (1945) – nominated for Best Song.

5:00 p.m. Star! (1968) – nominated for Best Song.

The Most Decorated Decorator

When it comes to Art and Set Decorating, nobody comes close to Cedric Gibbons, with 39 nominations. TCM presents several examples of his nominated work.

8:00 p.m. Annie Get Your Gun (1950) – nominated for Best Art Decoration-Set Decoration, Color.

10:00 p.m. An American in Paris (1951) – won for Best Art Decoration-Set Decoration, Color.

12:00 a.m. Too Young to Kiss (1951) – nominated for Best Art Decoration-Set Decoration, Black-and-White.

2:00 a.m. The Picture of Dorian Gray (1945) – nominated for Best Art Direction-Interior Decoration, Black-and-White.

4:00 a.m. Thousands Cheer (1943) – nominated for Best Art Direction-Interior Decoration, Color.

Friday, Feb. 11

The Most Decorated Decorator (cont.)

6:15 a.m. National Velvet (1944) – nominated for Best Art Direction-Interior Decoration, Color.

8:30 a.m. The Yearling (1946) – won for Best Art Direction-Interior Decoration, Color.

10:45 a.m. Random Harvest (1942) – nominated for Best Art Direction-Interior Decoration, Black-and-White.

1:00 p.m. Quo Vadis (1951) – nominated for Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Color.

4:00 p.m. Executive Suite (1954) – nominated for Best Art Direction-Set Decoration, Black-and-White.

5:45 p.m. Little Women (1949) – won for Best Art Decoration-Set Decoration, Color.

Any Regrets?

Many times in film history, actors and actress have turned down roles that went on to earn the eventual taker an Oscar Nomination. TCM presents some notable examples.

8:00 p.m. The Graduate (1967) – According to her book, Doris Day turned down the role of Mrs. Robinson because of the part of an older woman seducing a man half her age conflicted with her values. The role led to Anne Bancroft’s nomination as Best Actress.

10:00 p.m. Forrest Gump (1994) – John Travolta was originally offered the title role that Tom Hanks accepted – leading to his second consecutive Best Actor Academy Award. Travolta admits the mistake of turning it down, but it did free him up to take his Oscar-nominated role in Pulp Fiction.

12:30 a.m. Pretty Woman (1990) – Molly Ringwald was one of the actresses that turned down the role of a prostitute with a heart of gold, the same role that made Julia Roberts a star and earned her an Oscar nomination. Ringwald has since said that turning it down was a mistake.

2:45 a.m. Cat Ballou (1965) – Kirk Douglas turned down the dual role that brought Lee Marvin an Oscar for Best Actor, playing both the bad guy, Tim Strawn, as well as Kid Shelleen, the drunken gunfighter who helps save the day.

Brother and Sister Acts

The only brother and sister to each win an Oscar for acting are Lionel and Ethel Barrymore. TCM presents the performances that led to honors for this Hollywood dynasty.

4:30 a.m. A Free Soul (1931) – Lionel Barrymore won for Best Actor.

6:15 a.m. None But the Lonely Heart (1944) – Ethel Barrymore won for Best Supporting Actress.

Saturday, Feb. 12

The Best of the Best

Most people consider 1939 to be Hollywood at its peak, the greatest year ever for American filmmaking. These are all 10 of the films from that year that were nominated for Best Picture, including the ultimate winner, Gone with the Wind:

8:15 a.m. Dark Victory (1939)

10:00 a.m. Of Mice and Men (1939)

12:00 p.m. Ninotchka (1939)

2:00 p.m. Wuthering Heights (1939)

4:00 p.m. Stagecoach (1939)

5:45 p.m. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939)

8:00 p.m. The Wizard of Oz (1939)

10:00 p.m. Gone With the Wind (1939)

2:00 a.m. Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939)

4:00 a.m. Love Affair (1939)

Sunday, Feb. 13

They Shoot, He Scores

Alfred Newman has received 45 nominations for his film scores, tying him with John Williams for the most by any composer. Amazingly, he was nominated 20 years in a row from 1938 to 1957. Below are some of his nominated and winning films scores.

6:00 a.m. The Cowboy and the Lady (1938) – nominated for Best Score.

8:00 a.m. The Keys of the Kingdom (1944) – nominated for Best Score.

10:30 a.m. Camelot (1967) – won for Best Score.

1:45 p.m. Daddy Long Legs (1955) – nominated for Best Score.

4:00 p.m. Coney Island (1943) – nominated for Best Score.

6:00 p.m. Mother Wore Tights (1947) – won for Best Score.

It Takes Two

Very rarely has the same film won two different writing awards, but these four films were among the few.

8:00 p.m. Miracle on 34th Street (1947) – won for Best Original Story and Best Screenplay.

10:00 p.m. Going My Way (1944) – won for Best Original Story and Best Screenplay.

12:30 a.m. Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941) – won for Best Original Story and Best Screenplay.

2:15 a.m. The Story of Louis Pasteur (1936) – won for Best Original Story and Best Screenplay.

Oscar Falls in Love

In honor of Valentine’s Day, TCM presents some romantic comedies nominated for Best Picture.

4:00 a.m. A Room with a View (1985)

Monday, Feb. 14

Oscar Falls in Love (cont.)

6:00 a.m. Alice Adams (1935)

8:00 a.m. Flirtation Walk (1934)

10:00 a.m. The More the Merrier (1943)

12:00 p.m. The Talk of the Town (1942)

2:00 p.m. The Bishop’s Wife (1947)

4:00 p.m. The Philadelphia Story (1940)

6:00 p.m. The Goodbye Girl (1977)

All in the Family

Sometimes multiple members of the same family collaborate on a film, resulting in Oscar nominations. TCM presents some examples.

8:00 p.m. Rachel, Rachel (1968) – Paul Newman was up for an Oscar as producer of this Best Picture nominee, while his wife, Joanne Woodward, was nominated for Best Actress.

10:00 p.m. Casablanca (1942) – Twin brothers Julius and Philip Epstein both won Academy Awards for their screenplay.

12:00 a.m. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948) – John Huston was for Best Director and Best Screenplay, while directing his Father, Walter Huston, to a Best Supporting Actor Oscar.

2:15 a.m. Victor/Victoria (1982) – Blake Edwards was nominated for Best Adapted Screenplay, and he also directed his wife, Julie Andrews, to a Best Actress nomination.

French Kisses

While Italy has won the most awards in the Foreign Language category (with 10 as Best Foreign Language Film and three special awards before it became an official category), France has the most nominations. In all, French films have been nominated 35 times for the Best Foreign Language Film. French works have also received three special awards. TCM presents five French films honored by the Academy.

4:45 a.m. Cousin, Cousine (1975) – nominated for Best Foreign Language Film.

Tuesday, Feb. 15

French Kisses (cont.)

6:30 a.m. Au Revoir, Les Enfants (1987) – nominated for Best Foreign Language Film.

8:15 a.m. The Last Metro (1980) – nominated for Best Foreign Language Film.

10:30 a.m. Black Orpheus (1959) – won for Best Foreign Language Film.

12:30 p.m. Mon Oncle (1958) – won for Best Foreign Language Film.

The Most Writing Nominations

Woody Allen has earned the most Oscar nominations for his writing, with a total of 14. TCM presents three of his nominated films.

2:30 p.m. Alice (1990) – nominated for Best Original Screenplay.

4:30 p.m. Radio Days (1987) – nominated for Best Original Screenplay.

6:00 p.m. Hannah and Her Sisters (1986) – won for Best Original Screenplay.

Oscar Firsts

8:00 p.m. My Man Godfrey (1936) – first film to be nominated in all four acting categories.

10:00 p.m. Cimarron (1930) – first western to win Best Picture; first film to be nominated in all five major categories: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress and Best Screenplay.

12:15 a.m. Lilies of the Field (1963) – first Best Actor win for an African-American – Sidney Poitier.

2:00 a.m. Kiss of the Spider Woman (1985) – first independent film to be nominated for Best Picture.

4:15 a.m. Two Women (1960) – first foreign language role to win an Academy Award – Best Actress Sophia Loren.

Wednesday, Feb. 16

Oscar Firsts (cont.)

6:00 a.m. Grand Illusion (1937) – first foreign-language film to be nominated for Best Picture.

8:00 a.m. Chang (1927) – first documentary to be nominated for an Academy Award.

9:30 a.m. Lady for a Day (1933) – first future acting nominee – Best Actress nominee May Robson, born in 1858.

11:15 a.m. The Life of Emile Zola (1937) – first biopic to win as Best Picture.

1:15 p.m. Since You Went Away (1944) – first performer to be nominated for a supporting role after winning as a lead – Jennifer Jones, who won for Best Actress the year before for The Song of Bernadette.

4:15 p.m. Sounder (1972) – first film to have African-American nominees in both the Best Actor and Best Actress categories – Paul Winfield and Cicely Tyson.

6:15 p.m. Swing Time (1936) – first woman to win in the Best Song category – Dorothy Fields, for her lyrics to “The Way You Look Tonight.”

It’s an Honor Just to be Nominated

Peter O’Toole has been nominated for Best Actor eight times and never won the award. TCM presents some of his nominated performances:

8:00 p.m. My Favorite Year (1982)

10:00 p.m. Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

2:00 a.m. The Stunt Man (1980)

4:15 a.m. The Ruling Class (1972)

Thursday, Feb. 17

It’s an Honor Just to be Nominated (cont.)

7:00 a.m. Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1969)

How to Earn An Oscar Nomination

It seems that playing a prostitute gives actresses a leg up when it comes to earning a nomination. TCM presents some examples.

10:00 a.m. Never on Sunday (1960) – Melina Mercouri nominated for Best Actress.

12:00 p.m. Butterfield 8 (1960) – Elizabeth Taylor won for Best Actress.

2:00 p.m. Street Angel (1928) – Janet Gaynor won for Best Actress.

4:00 p.m. Anna Christie (1930) – Greta Garbo nominated for Best Actress.

5:30 p.m. Irma La Douce (1963) – Shirley MacLaine nominated for Best Actress.

Auspicious Debuts

TCM presents several directorial debuts that were nominated in the Best Director and Best Picture categories:

8:00 p.m. 12 Angry Men (1957) – Sidney Lumet.

10:00 p.m. Chariots of Fire (1981) – Hugh Hudson. Film won for Best Picture.

12:15 a.m. Room at the Top (1959) – Jack Clayton.

2:15 a.m. American Beauty (1999) – Sam Mendes. Film won for Best Picture.

Oscar ♥ New York

While Hollywood is on the other coast, New York is the setting for more Oscar-nominated films than any other city.

4:15 a.m. Do the Right Thing (1989) – nominated for Best Supporting Actor, Danny Aiello; Best Original Screenplay, Spike Lee.

Friday, Feb. 18

Oscar ♥ New York (cont.)

6:30 a.m. Naked City (1948) – won for Best Cinematography, William H. Daniels; Best Editing, Paul Weatherwax; nominated for Best Story, Malvin Wald.

8:15 a.m. Dead End (1937) – nominated for Best Picture; Best Supporting Actress, Claire Trevor; Best Cinematography, Gregg Toland; Best Art Direction, Richard Day.

10:00 a.m. Angels with Dirty Faces (1938) – nominated for Best Actor, James Cagney; Best Director, Michael Curtiz; Best Original Screenplay, Roland Brown.

11:45 a.m. On the Town (1949) – won for Best Score, Roger Edens and Lennie Hayton.

1:30 p.m. It’s Always Fair Weather (1955) – nominated for Best Original Screenplay, Betty Comden and Adolph Green; Best Score, Andre Previn.

3:15 p.m. My Sister Eileen (1942) – nominated for Best Actress, Rosalind Russell.

5:00 p.m. The Producers (1968) – nominated for Best Actor, Gene Wilder; Best Original Screenplay, Mel Brooks.

6:30 p.m. It Should Happen to You (1954) – nominated for Best Costume Design, Jean Louis.

The Most Writing Wins

Four people share the record for writing Oscars with three each, including Paddy Chayefsky. TCM presents his three winning films and the film that earned him a nomination.

8:00 p.m. The Hospital (1971) – won for Best Original Screenplay.

10:00 p.m. Marty (1955) – won for Best Adapted Screenplay.

12:00 a.m. Network (1976) – won for Best Original Screenplay.

2:15 a.m. The Goddess (1958) – nominated for Best Original Screenplay.

The Most Best Actor Nominations

While Jack Nicholson has the most acting nominations for a male, including both lead and supporting roles, Spencer Tracy holds the record for most Best Actor nominations, with nine. TCM presents several of his nominated performances.

4:15 a.m. San Francisco (1936)

Saturday, Feb. 19

The Most Best Actor Nominations (cont.)

6:15 a.m. Bad Day at Black Rock (1955)

7:45 a.m. The Old Man and the Sea (1958)

9:15 a.m. Inherit the Wind (1960)

11:30 a.m. Captains Courageous (1937)

The Most Supportive Actor

Walter Brennan holds the record for most wins as Best Supporting Actor, with three. He is also tied for the most nominations, with four. Below are three of his nominated performances, including two that won.

1:30 p.m. Come and Get It (1936) – won for Best Supporting Actor.

3:30 p.m. The Westerner (1940) – won for Best Supporting Actor.

5:30 p.m. Sergeant York (1941) – nominated for Best Supporting Actor.

Clean Sweeps

Five times in Academy Awards history the Best Picture winner has won in every category it was nominated. Only three times has it happened when more than five nominations were at stake. TCM presents all three.

8:00 p.m. Gigi (1958) –nine nominations, nine wins.

10:00 p.m. The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King (2003) – 11 nominations, 11 wins.

1:30 a.m. The Last Emperor (1987) –nine nominations, nine wins.

Nominated for Best Director, not Best Picture

TCM presents several great films that received a nomination for Best Director but not for Best Picture.

4:15 a.m. Blow-Up (1966) – Michelangelo Antonioni nominated for Best Director.

Sunday, Feb. 20

Nominated for Best Director, not Best Picture (cont.)

6:15 a.m. 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) – Stanley Kubrick nominated for Best Director.

9:00 a.m. Summertime (1955) – David Lean nominated for Best Director.

11:00 a.m. Morocco (1930) – Joseph von Sternberg nominated for Best Director.

12:45 p.m. In Cold Blood (1967) – Richard Brooks nominated for Best Director.

3:15 p.m. The Third Man (1949) – Carol Reed nominated for Best Director.

5:15 p.m. The Inn of the Sixth Happiness (1958) – Mark Robson nominated for Best Director.

From Stage to Screen

Many times in the history of the Academy Awards, an actor or an actress has taken an acclaimed stage role and turned it into an Oscar nomination. TCM presents several examples.

8:00 p.m. Born Yesterday (1950) – Judy Holliday won for Best Actress.

10:00 p.m. My Fair Lady (1964) – Rex Harrison won for Best Actor.

1:00 a.m. Auntie Mame (1958) – Rosalind Russell nominated for Best Actress.

3:30 a.m. The Hasty Heart (1949) – Richard Todd nominated for Best Actor.

5:30 a.m. Night Must Fall (1937) – May Whitty nominated for Best Supporting Actress.

Monday, Feb. 21

From Stage to Screen (cont.)

7:30 a.m. The Subject Was Roses (1968) – Jack Albertson won for Best Supporting Actor.

9:30 a.m. Sweet Bird of Youth (1962) – Geraldine Page nominated for Best Actress.

12:00 p.m. Watch on the Rhine (1943) – Paul Lukas won Best Actor.

2:00 p.m. The Magnificent Yankee (1950) – Louis Calhern nominated for Best Actor.

3:30 p.m. The Bad Seed (1956) – Nancy Kelly nominated for Best Actress.

6:00 p.m. The Member of the Wedding (1952) – Julie Harris nominated for Best Actress.

Oscar Onlys

8:00 p.m. State Fair (1945) – Oscar Hammerstein is the only Oscar to win an Oscar. He won for Best Song in this film, in addition to winning for Lady Be Good four years earlier.

10:00 p.m. The Best Years of Our Lives (1946) – Harold Russell is the only actor to win two Oscars for playing the same role. He won a special Oscar for “bringing hope and courage to his fellow veterans,” and he won for Best Supporting Actor.

1:00 a.m. Pygmalion (1938) – George Bernard Shaw is the only Nobel Prize winner to earn an Oscar.

2:45 a.m. Two Arabian Knights (1927) – The only film to win for Best Comedy Direction, which was awarded only once, the first year of the Academy Awards.

4:30 a.m. A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1935) – Cinematographer Hal Mohr is the only write-in Oscar winner ever.

Tuesday, Feb. 22

Oscar Onlys (cont.)

7:00 a.m. The Divine Lady (1929) – The only film to win the Academy Award for Best Director – Frank Lloyd – for a film that wasn’t nominated for Best Picture. Two Arabian Knights won for Best Comedy Direction without a nomination for Best Picture.

8:45 a.m. Limelight (1952) – The only film to win an Academy Award more than 20 years after it was made. Although produced in 1952, it didn’t play in Los Angeles until 1972, making it eligible for Academy consideration. It was nominated and won for its score, the only competitive Oscar that Charles Chaplin ever won.

11:15 a.m. A Day at the Races (1937) – The only Marx Brothers film to receive an Academy Award nomination. It was nominated for Best Dance Direction.

1:15 p.m. Ship of Fools (1965) – Michael Dunn, nominated for Best Supporting Actor, is the only little person to be nominated for an acting Oscar.

3:45 p.m. The Devil and Daniel Webster (1941) – Walter Huston, nominated for Best Actor, is the only person nominated for playing the devil.

5:45 p.m. Skippy (1931) – The only Best Picture nominee to be based on a comic strip.

7:15 p.m. The Red Balloon (1956) – The only film with no dialogue to win an Oscar and the only short subject to win outside of the short film categories. The film won for Best Original Screenplay.

Two in One

Seventeen times in Academy Award history, the same film has produced two Best Actor or Best Actress nominations, pitting the co-stars against one another. TCM presents some stellar examples.

8:00 p.m. The Defiant Ones (1958) – Sidney Poiter and Tony Curtis were both nominated.

10:00 p.m. Amadeus (1984) – F. Murray Abraham won and Tom Hulce was nominated.

1:00 a.m. Thelma & Louise (1991) – Geena Davis and Susan Sarandon were both nominated.

3:15 a.m. Giant (1956) – James Dean and Rock Hudson were nominated.

Wednesday, Feb. 23

Two in One (cont.)

6:45 a.m. Suddenly, Last Summer (1959) – Elizabeth Taylor and Katharine Hepburn nominated.

Sound Bites

As head of the Columbia sound department, John Livadary holds the record for consecutive nominations in the Best Sound category. He was nominated for 13 straight years from 1934 to 1946. TCM presents several examples of his work.

8:45 a.m. Too Many Husbands (1940)

10:15 p.m. The Men in Her Life (1941)

12:00 p.m. You Were Never Lovelier (1942)

2:00 p.m. Sahara (1943)

4:00 p.m. Cover Girl (1944)

6:00 p.m. A Song to Remember (1945)

Best Picture, But Not the Most Academy Awards

The winner of the Best Picture Oscar usually wins more awards than any other film that year. But 14 times in the history of the Academy Awards, the Best Picture winner won fewer than another film the same year. TCM presents several examples.

8:00 p.m. All the King’s Men (1949) – won three Academy Awards, including Best Picture; The Heiress won four.

10:00 p.m. You Can’t Take It with You (1938) – won two Academy Awards, including Best Picture; The Adventures of Robin Hood won three.

12:15 a.m. The Great Ziegfeld (1936) – won three Academy Awards, including Best Picture; Anthony Adverse won four.

Most Honored Foreign Director

Four of Federico Fellini’s films have won the most Oscars for Best Foreign Language Film. In addition, he’s been nominated for Best Director four times. TCM presents three of his winning films.

3:30 a.m. Amarcord (1973)

Thursday, Feb. 24

Most Honored Foreign Director (cont.)

6:00 a.m. 8 ½ (1963)

8:30 a.m. La Strada (1954)

Awards by Association

Alec Guinness’ films have won more Oscars than any other performer, with a total of 35. TCM presents films representing nine of those Oscars.

10:30 a.m. The Lavender Hill Mob (1951) – won for Best Story and Screenplay.

12:00 p.m. Great Expectations (1946) – won for Best Cinematography and Best Art Direction.

2:00 p.m. Cromwell (1970) – won for Best Costume Design.

4:30 p.m. Doctor Zhivago (1965) – won for Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Cinematography, Best Score, Best Art Direction, Best Costume Design.

Most Directing Nominations

William Wyler leads the pack with 12 nominations for Best Director. TCM presents four of his nominated films:

8:00 p.m. Dodsworth (1936)

10:00 p.m. Ben-Hur (1959)

2:00 a.m. Friendly Persuasion (1956)

4:30 a.m. The Collector (1965)

Friday, Feb. 25

Sister Acts

The only two sisters to win Academy Awards as Best Actress are Joan Fontaine and Olivia de Havilland. TCM presents Fontaine’s winning performance and one of de Havilland’s two Best Actress performances.

7:00 a.m. Suspicion (1941) – Joan Fontaine won for Best Actress.

9:00 a.m. To Each His Own (1946) – Olivia de Havilland won for Best Actress. She also won again for The Heiress three years later.

Rookies of the Year

TCM presents films featuring actors who earned nominations for their film debuts.

11:15 a.m. Marie Antoinette (1938) – Robert Morley nominated for Best Supporting Actor.

2:00 p.m. The Corn is Green (1945) – John Dall nominated for Best Supporting Actor.

4:00 p.m. The Search (1948) – Montgomery Clift nominated for Best Actor in his film debut; Red River was the first production, but The Search was the first to be released.

6:00 p.m. Bus Stop (1956) – Don Murray nominated for Best Supporting Actor.

Five for Four

Although there are only four categories for acting – Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Supporting Actor, Best Supporting Actress – nine times in Oscar history a movie has been nominated for five acting awards, with multiple nominations in at least one of the categories. TCM presents a night of films with five acting nominations.

8:00 p.m. On the Waterfront (1954) – Marlon Brando won for Best Actor; Eva Marie Saint won for Best Actress; Lee J. Cobb, Karl Malden and Rod Steiger nominated for Best Supporting Actor.

10:00 p.m. From Here to Eternity (1953) – Frank Sinatra won for Best Supporting Actor; Donna Reed won for Best Supporting Actress; Montgomery Clift and Burt Lancaster nominated for Best Actor; Deborah Kerr nominated for Best Actress.

12:15 a.m. Tom Jones (1963) – Albert Finney nominated for Best Actor; Hugh Griffith nominated for Best Supporting Actor; Diane Cilento, Edith Evans, Joyce Redman were all nominated for Best Supporting Actress.

2:30 a.m. Bonnie and Clyde (1967) – Estelle Parsons won for Best Supporting Actress; Warren Beatty nominated for Best Actor; Faye Dunaway nominated for Best Actress; Gene Hackman and Michael J. Pollard nominated for Best Supporting Actor.

On Second Thought

TCM presents several Best Picture nominees that were remakes of previous films.

4:30 a.m. Mutiny on the Bounty (1962) – remake of 1935 original that won Best Picture.

Saturday, Feb. 26

On Second Thought (cont.)

7:45 a.m. Ivanhoe (1952) – remake of 1913 original.

9:45 a.m. King Solomon’s Mines (1950) – remake of 1937 original.

11:45 p.m. The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938) – remake of 1922’s Robin Hood.

1:45 p.m. The Letter (1940) – remake of 1929 original.

3:30 p.m. The Maltese Falcon (1941) – remake of 1931 original and 1936’s Satan Met a Lady.

5:30 p.m. Fanny (1961) – remake of the 1932 French original.

The Big Five

Only three times in the history of the Academy Awards has a film won in each of the five major categories – Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Screenplay. TCM presents all three.

8:00 p.m. It Happened One Night (1934)

10:00 p.m. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)

12:30 a.m. The Silence of the Lambs (1991)

Real Women

TCM presents a collection of films that earned women nominations for playing real people.

2:45 a.m. Frances (1980) – Jessica Lange nominated for Best Actress for playing the actress Frances Farmer.

5:15 a.m. Silkwood (1983) – Meryl Streep nominated for Best Actress for playing whistleblower Karen Silkwood.

Sunday, Feb. 27

Real Women (cont.)

8:00 a.m. Sister Kenny (1946) – Rosalind Russell nominated for Best Actress for playing nurse Elizabeth Kenny.

10:30 a.m. I’ll Cry Tomorrow (1955) – Susan Hayward nominated for Best Actress for playing actress Lillian Roth.

12:45 p.m. I Want to Live! (1958) – Susan Hayward won for Best Actress for playing convicted murderer Barbara Graham.

3:00 p.m. Sunrise at Campobello (1960) – Greer Garson nominated for Best Actress for playing First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt.

5:30 p.m. Joan of Arc (1948) – Ingrid Bergman nominated for Best Actress for playing the French saint.

Notable No-Shows

8:00 p.m. Mildred Pierce (1945) – Winner Joan Crawford worried about losing, so she claimed she was sick and stayed home.

10:00 p.m. Annie Hall (1977) – Woody Allen typically spends Oscar night playing his clarinet at a favorite New York hangout.

12:00 a.m. The Informer (1935) – Screenwriter Dudley Nichols became the first Oscar winner to refuse his award, citing a strike by the Screen Writers Guild.

2:00 a.m. Morning Glory (1933) – Katharine Hepburn always refused to attend the ceremony when she was nominated.

The Lion Roars

Before 1951, the Best Picture Academy Award was officially a competition among the studios, rather than individual producers, and MGM was the studio with the most nominations with a total of 41. TCM presents several of MGM’s Best Picture nominees.

3:30 a.m. Smilin’ Through (1932)

5:30 a.m. Broadway Melody of 1936 (1935)

Monday, Feb. 28

The Lion Roars (cont.)

7:30 a.m. David Copperfield (1935)

9:45 a.m. A Tale of Two Cities (1935)

12:00 p.m. The Citadel (1938)

2:00 p.m. The Human Comedy (1943)

4:00 p.m. Test Pilot (1938)

6:00 p.m. Battleground (1949)

Nomination in a Bottle

Dozens of times actors have been nominated for portraying alcoholics, including Jeff Bridges for his role as a faded country musician in last year’s Crazy Heart. TCM presents several other performances as alcoholics that have earned nominations.

8:00 p.m. Arthur (1981) – Dudley Moore nominated for Best Actor.

10:00 p.m. The Lost Weekend (1945) – Ray Milland won for Best Actor.

12:00 a.m. Days of Wine and Roses (1962) – Jack Lemmon nominated for Best Actor.

2:00 a.m. Under the Volcano (1984) – Albert Finney nominated for Best Actor.

4:00 a.m. The Dresser (1983) – Albert Finney nominated for Best Actor.

Tuesday, March 1

Nomination in a Bottle (cont.)

6:15 a.m. Johnny Eager (1942) – Van Heflin won for Best Supporting Actor.

8:15 a.m. Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958) – Paul Newman nominated for Best Actor.

Two by Four

Many times in Academy Awards history, the same character has led to multiple acting nominations. TCM presents four films with two of the twice-nominated characters.

10:30 a.m. A Star is Born (1937) – Fredric March nominated for Best Actor for portraying the self- destructive alcoholic actor, Norman Maine.

12:30 p.m. A Star is Born (1954) – James Mason nominated for Best Actor in the remake, also for playing Norman Maine.

3:30 p.m. Cyrano de Bergerac (1950) – Jose Ferrer won for Best Actor in the title role of the film adaptation of the classic Edmond Rostand play.

5:30 p.m. Cyrano de Bergerac (1990) – Gerard Depardieu was nominated for Best Actor in the French-language version of the same film 40 years later.

Oscar Mosts

8:00 p.m. The Emperor Waltz (1948) – Edith Head is the most nominated and winning woman of all time, with 35 nominations and eight wins, all for Best Costume Design. This was her first nomination.

10:00 p.m. All About Eve (1950) – This is tied with Titanic for the most nominations for a single film, with 14.

12:30 a.m. Cabaret (1972) – This film that won the most Academy Awards – eight – without winning Best Picture.

2:45 a.m. Somebody Up There Likes Me (1956) – Joseph Ruttenberg is tied with Leon Shamroy for the most Best Cinematography Oscars, with four. This is one of his winning films.

4:45 a.m. Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow (1963) – Italy has won the most Oscars for Best Foreign Language film, including this Vittorio de Sica classic starring Sophia Loren.

Wednesday, March 2

The Most Honored Producer

With a total of 19 nominations, Hal B. Wallis holds the record for most Best Picture nominations as a producer, his only win coming for Casablanca. TCM presents some of his nominated films.

6:45 a.m. Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942)

9:00 a.m. Jezebel (1938)

11:00 a.m. All This and Heaven Too (1940)

1:30 p.m. Captain Blood (1935)

3:45 p.m. Kings Row (1942)

6:15 p.m. Four Daughters (1938)

Gone But Not Forgotten

Dozens of times throughout the history of the Academy Awards, actors and filmmakers have been nominated posthumously. TCM presents a few examples.

8:00 p.m. East of Eden (1955) – James Dean nominated for Best Actor. He was the only actor to be nominated twice after his death, as he was also nominated for Giant the following year.

10:00 p.m. Around the World in 80 Days (1956) – Victor Young won for Best Score.

1:30 a.m. Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes (1984) – Ralph Richardson nominated for Best Supporting Actor.

4:00 a.m. Obsession (1976) – Bernard Herrmann nominated for Best Score.

Thursday, March 3

Gone But Not Forgotten (cont.)

6:00 a.m. The Great Caruso (1951) – Gile Steele nominated for Best Costume Design.

8:00a.m. The Merry Widow (1952) – Gile Steele nominated for Best Costume Design.

10:00 a.m. The Way We Were (1973) – William Kiernan nominated for Best Art Direction.

12:30 p.m. North by Northwest (1959) – William Horning nominated for Best Art Direction.

3:00 p.m. How the West Was Won (1962) – William Ferrari nominated for Best Art Direction.

6:00 p.m. Shall We Dance (1937) – George Gershwin was nominated for his music to the song “They Can’t Take That Away From Me.”

One and Done

Only three times has a film has won the Academy Award for Best Picture and no other Oscars. TCM presents all three.

8:00 p.m. Grand Hotel (1932) – also the only Best Picture winner to only be nominated in that category.

10:00 p.m. Mutiny on the Bounty (1935)

12:30 a.m. The Broadway Melody (1929)

Nominated for Playing a Nominee

Several actors and actresses have been nominated for playing Oscar nominees. TCM presents two examples.

2:15 a.m. The Star (1952) – Bette Davis nominated for Best Actress for playing a fading actress who’d once won an Oscar as Best Actress.

4:00 a.m. California Suite (1978) – Maggie Smith won for Best Supporting Actress for playing an actress nominated for an Oscar.

Schedule subject to change. Programming for TCM in Canada may vary slightly from this schedule.

Print
Add This
The HeldenFiles Online Archives

SUBSCRIBE VIA RSS

OHIO.COM VIDEOS

Blogs:

Heldenfels' mailbag

Prev Next

INFORMATIONAL PAGES