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"Lost" and Some Tuesday Viewing

By admin Published: February 7, 2007

"Lost" fatigue, some possible spoilers from last night's telecasts and proof that I am a sentimental fool, after the jump ...

I watched tonight's hey-we're-back episode of "Lost" a week or so ago. It was OK. Some questions are answered, and even intriguingly. The overall story puts at least a comma on the saga of Jack, Sawyer and Kate on the small Island of Dr. Moreau, or whatever it is, so that in a week we can get back to seeing more of the core characters back on the big Pleasure Island, or whatever it is.

But here's the thing: I don't want "Lost" to be just OK. I want that feeling where I could talk for an entire week, from the end of one episode to the beginning of the next, about what is going on. I want to feel as if I'm getting closer to something; even when "Lost" gives me info now, I know that it is holding back far more than it is giving. Lately, it's been more like a very long book that I am determined to finish even if it's not that much fun to read.

Still, I watched it. It was OK. Just keep your expectations low.

As for the sentimental fool thing, both "Gilmore Girls" and "Veronica Mars" choked me up.

Loved the "Veronica" line about "Footloose" -- and overall I liked the way "VM" was absolutely respectful of its TV-evangelist character; in a way, it was a continuation of last week's don't-misjudge-the-prostitute story. The ending was very nicely done (although, were I Veronica, I probably still would have cubed Madison's car), but even better was the scene with Veronica and the preacher in his office. Tissues, please.

Not so thrilled with the deterioration of Logan, even if he carried off the cell-phone monologue. You pretty well knew Veronica wasn't going to listen past the insults. Interesting, though, that both "VM" and "Gilmore Girls" built key scenes around cell-phone monologues. Anyway, I just wish they would settle this whole Veronica-Logan thing once and for all. It's just toxic for the storytelling to keep dragging it out. And even as we're moving closer to resolution of the dean-murder story, I am tending to forget it's there. Right now the self-contained stories are much stronger.

"Gilmore," then. Big sweepsy thing with Richard's heart attack. Hard to believe Christopher would be AWOL so long, except that -- as I was saying to someone after last week's show -- leaving is basically something Christopher does, much the way Luke's thing is showing up. The rhythms of Lorelai's jokiness felt off in the early going. And still ...

Kelly Bishop as Emily Gilmore was a marvel, from her grand entrance through her gift-shop meltdown. She did not hit a wrong note, and in the last hospital scene with her and Richard you saw a couple who really had figured out a loving partnership. And do not for a moment forget that it is loving. Superbly done, at least to this old fool.

"House" was fine enough, and one where the medical case hardly mattered. But here's one example of why I like the show: When "House" has to negotiate the wheelchair from the observation area down to surgery, I thought sure he would realize that he had to end the bet. After all, being in the wheelchair cost him precious time when someone's life was at stake. But that sort of caring epiphany would not be "House." Even when he briefly abandoned the wheelchair, it was not so much about saving the patient as about proving he was right. And after that, he still thought he could win the bet. House is that kind of rat, after all -- and a rat worth watching just about every week.

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