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New-TV Friday

By admin Published: September 24, 2010

Tonight brings the premiere of "Blue Bloods" on CBS along with the season premieres of "Medium," "CSI:NY" (with new cast member Sela Ward), "Dateline," "The Good Guys," "Smallville" and "Supernatural." The premiere of "School Pride," at one point announced for tonight, will be on Oct. 15.

I have seen "Blue Bloods" and "CSI:NY." I also took a look at the second episode of "Outlaw," which premiered last week. Notes after the jump.

I am a fan of Tom Selleck's work, especially the Jesse Stone movies. He has become a better actor over the years, and very good at using silence -- letting his expressive (without exaggeration) face do a lot of the work. This makes him particularly effective as characters holding in emotions and secrets, like Stone or Frank Reagan, his character on "Blue Bloods."

"Blue Bloods" is a cop show with a serialized-family-drama underpinning; Reagan and his sons Danny (Donnie Wahlberg) and Jamie (Will Estes) are all cops -- Frank is the police commissioner-- and Frank's father Henry (Len Cariou) is a former chief; Frank's daughter Erin (Bridget Moynahan) is an assistant DA. The premiere juggles crime in the streets and closed-door political maneuvers, family bonds and family conflicts. I didn't think it was great, but I did find it intriguing enough to watch again, and not only for Selleck.

I checked out "CSI:NY," a show I watch only sporadically, to see how it handled the departure of Stella (Akron's own Melina Kanakaredes) and the arrival of the new character played by Ward. The latter is done with a body found in an unusual place and a lot of joking around; the tone is much lighter than what I remember of previous "CSI:NY's," more in the manner of the humor-flecked "NCIS." Stella's absence, by the way, is noted, and is not fatal; one of the crew receives a letter from Stella which notes she has moved on to a new job in another city. As for the episode overall, I did not find it all that interesting but, as I have said, this is not a show I've been hooked on anyway.

The second episode of "Outlaw" tries to do something a little different from the pilot, but has some of the same flaws. The difference is that it indicates that Garza's politics are more complicated than was suggested a week ago, as he weighs into a controversial case involving Arizona's immigration law, which requires police to question people they suspect are illegal immigrants. Like the first episode, this one finds Jimmy Smits in good form. Also like the first episode, I didn't think the legal side was well handled. As with the premiere of ABC's "The Whole Truth," you are likely to watch this and wonder how TV lawyers could make so many obvious mistakes. (In "Outlaw," the prosecutor, pursuing a political agenda, seems quite incompetent.) Haven't given up on the show, but am not feeling a real need to watch more.

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