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Upcoming Cleveland Cinematheque Offerings

By admin Published: February 14, 2011

Lots of intriguing stuff, notably Paul Schrader talking about "Light of Day," with Michael J. Fox, Joan Jett and the city of Cleveland; and a presentation of "Shoah," recently revisited on "Ebert Presents At the Movies."

The official word: Sixteen shorts and features written and directed by Charles Chaplin will be shown in March and April at the Cleveland Institute of Art Cinematheque during a seven-week film series entitled "Sunnyside: The Silent Films of Charlie Chaplin." Chaplin stars in all but one of the movies to be shown, which include comedy classics like SUNNYSIDE, CITY LIGHTS, and THE GOLD RUSH. All films will be shown in 35mm prints with music scores. The series runs March 5-20 and April 7-30.

SAT. 3/5 5:15 PM THE CIRCUS & PAY DAY

SUN. 3/6 6:30 PM THE CIRCUS & PAY DAY

SAT. 3/12 4:45 PM A WOMAN OF PARIS & SUNNYSIDE

SUN. 3/13 6:30 PM A WOMAN OF PARIS & SUNNYSIDE

SAT. 3/19 5:15 PM THE GOLD RUSH & A DAY'S PLEASURE

SUN. 3/20 6:30 PM THE GOLD RUSH & A DAY'S PLEASURE

THU. 4/7 8:45 PM THE CHAPLIN REVUE (A DOG'S LIFE, SHOULDER ARMS, THE PILGRIM)

SAT. 4/9 5:00 PM THE CHAPLIN REVUE (A DOG'S LIFE, SHOULDER ARMS, THE PILGRIM)

SAT. 4/16 5:15 PM CHAPLIN MUTUAL MASTERPIECES (EASY STREET, THE CURE, THE IMMIGRANT, THE ADVENTURER)

SUN. 4/17 6:30 PM CHAPLIN MUTUAL MASTERPIECES (EASY STREET, THE CURE, THE IMMIGRANT, THE ADVENTURER)

FRI. 4/22 7:30 PM THE KID & THE IDLE CLASS

SAT. 4/23 5:15 PM THE KID & THE IDLE CLASS

FRI. 4/29 7:30 PM CITY LIGHTS

SAT. 4/30 5:15 PM CITY LIGHTS

In addition to Chaplin silents, the Cinematheque's March-April schedule includes these highlights:

-a rare theatrical showing of the epic Holocaust documentary SHOAH (in a new 35mm print) on March 12 & 13

-personal appearances by two prominent filmmakers: writer-director Paul Schrader (with his shot-in-Cleveland movie LIGHT OF DAY) on March 18 & animator Bill Plympton (with his latest feature IDIOTS AND ANGELS) on April 14.

-the second Cleveland Cult Film Festival (March 25 - April 2). showcasing PSYCHO, RAGING BULL, and more

The complete two-month schedule is below. [After the jump.] Unless noted, all films will show in the Aitken Auditorium of the Cleveland Institute of Art, 11141 East Boulevard in University Circle, telephone (216) 421-7450, www.cia.edu/cinematheque. Unless noted, admission to each film is $9 (Cinematheque members $6), or $15 for two films on the same day (members $12). Kids 12 & under can see most of the Chaplin programs for only $6. Free parking for filmgoers is available in the adjacent CIA lot, located off of East Boulevard. For further information, images, or screeners, call Tim Harry or John Ewing at (216) 421-7450.


MARCH 3-6

Thursday, March 3, at 6:45 pm

The Silver Anniversary Screen

Double-Screen Warhol x 2!

OUTER AND INNER SPACE

USA, 1965, Andy Warhol

THE VELVET UNDERGROUND

USA, 1966, Andy Warhol

Throughout his filmmaking career, Andy Warhol experimented with double-screen projection—most famously in his three-and-a-half-hour Chelsea Girls (1966). Tonight we will show two of Warhol’s dual-projector short works. Outer and Inner Space, his first double-screen movie, captures Warhol superstar Edie Sedgwick in front of a TV monitor that is showing a pre-recorded videotape of her. (So two Edies x 2.) In both the film and the videotape, she talks to someone off camera. The Velvet Underground is a “promotional” film intended for exhibition behind the Velvets in performance. Shot on a set at Warhol’s Factory, it shows Lou Reed, John Cale, and Sterling Morrison playing with whips, tying Maureen Tucker to a chair, dancing a little, and scattering food on the floor. There is sound but no music. 16mm. Total 66 min.

Thursday, March 3, at 8:15 pm &

Saturday, March 5, at 9:20 pm

Original, Uncut Version!

ENTER THE VOID

France/Germany/Italy, 2009, Gaspar Noé

Here’s a 35mm color & scope print of the original, uncut version of Gaspar Noé’s hallucinatory new film, 20 minutes longer than the version shown at the Cedar Lee in December. Once again the visionary director of I Stand Alone and Irreversible has ventured into extreme new realms. Here the neon-lit club district of modern Tokyo—with its strobe lights, pulsating music, and fluorescent colors—becomes the haunting ground of a recently-deceased drug dealer who floats through space and enters objects and people in order to watch over the stripper sister he left behind. Noé’s endlessly tracking camera approximates astral projection, and the result is one of the greatest psychedelic head trips since Kubrick’s 2001. With Paz de la Huerta. No one under 17 admitted! Cleveland theatrical premiere. 160 min. www.ifcfilms.com/films/enter-the-void

Friday, March 4, at 7:30 pm &

Sunday, March 6, at 8:25 pm

RARE EXPORTS: A CHRISTMAS TALE

RARE EXPORTS

Finland/Norway/France/Sweden, 2010, Jalmari Helander

Why show a Christmas film in March? Well, this isn’t your typical heartwarming holiday classic but a spooky, darkly comic, grim fairy tale rooted in ancient Scandinavian mythology—about a Santa (found frozen in a block of ice in northern Finland) who turns out to be more monster than merrymaker. With similarities to Gremlins and The Thing, Rare Exports is a surefire future cult classic and “the best anti-Christmas Christmas movie since Bad Santa” (The Village Voice). Rated R. Cleveland premiere. Subtitles. 35mm. 84 min. www.rareexportsmovie.com

Friday, March 4, at 9:15 pm &

Saturday, March 5, at 7:10 pm &

Sunday, March 6, at 4:00 pm

THE TEMPEST

USA, 2010, Julie Taymor

Helen Mirren, Chris Cooper, Russell Brand, Alfred Molina, Djimon Hounsou, David Strathairn, Allan Cumming, and Tom Conti star in the new film by Oberlin grad Julie Taymor (Frida, Across the Universe, Broadway’s The Lion King and Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark)—an imaginative, uneven, but often brilliant new version of Shakespeare’s final play. The movie’s main innovation is that Prospero, the exiled wizard who lords over an island and all who inhabit it, is now a woman, Prospera (Mirren). This adds a new dimension to his/her relationship with daughter Miranda. But the character remains a magical puppetmaster who pulls the strings of the comic shipwreck survivors who stumble around the island. A 2010 New York Film Festival selection. Cleveland premiere. 35mm. 110 min. www.tempest-themovie.com

Saturday, March 5, at 5:15 pm &

Sunday, March 6, at 6:30 pm

Chaplin’s Silent Films

THE CIRCUS

USA, 1928, Charles Chaplin

Made between The Gold Rush and City Lights, the least-known of Chaplin’s silent comedy features finds the Little Tramp joining a circus, falling in love with a bareback rider, and hilariously battling monkeys on a high-wire. Preceded at showtime by Pay Day (1922), Chaplin’s final short, in which he plays a laborer enamored of the foreman’s daughter. New 35mm prints with music tracks. Total 94 min. janusfilms.com/chaplin/ Kids 12 & under $6.

Saturday, March 5, at 7:10 pm

THE TEMPEST

See 3/4 at 9:15 for description

Saturday, March 5, at 9:20 pm

ENTER THE VOID

See 3/3 at 8:15 for description

Sunday, March 6, at 4:00 pm

THE TEMPEST

See 3/4 at 9:15 for description

Sunday, March 6, at 6:30 pm

THE CIRCUS

See 3/5 at 5:15 for description

Sunday, March 6, at 8:25 pm

RARE EXPORTS: A CHRISTMAS TALE

See 3/4 at 7:30 for description

MARCH 10-14

Thursday, March 10, at 6:45 pm &

Friday, March 11, at 9:25 pm

Back by Popular Demand!

DOGTOOTH

KYNODONTAS

Greece, 2009, Giorgos Lanthimos

How did this edgy, transgressive movie ever become one of the five nominees for this year’s Oscar for Best Foreign Language Film? Though the nomination was well deserved, Dogtooth is not your typical middlebrow Academy Award contender. In fact, in February it was reported that some Academy members were booing, hissing, and walking out of screenings. It’s that kind of love-it-or-hate-it movie—a funny, chilling, and unforgettable black comedy about three grown siblings—a young man and two young women—who have spent their whole lives in a walled estate, cut off from the outside world. Still living with their control-freak parents who have brainwashed them with a skewed understanding of reality, these hermetic homeschoolers have their own bizarre games, rituals, and vocabulary. But growing sexual urges and the pervasiveness of America pop culture threaten to puncture their bubble. No one under 18 admitted! Subtitles. 35mm color & scope print! 94 min. www.kino.com/dogtooth/

Thursday, March 10, at 8:40 pm &

Friday, March 11, at 7:30 pm

Remembering Jafar Panahi

OFFSIDE

Iran, 2006, Jafar Panahi

Jafar Panahi, the brilliant Iranian director of The White Balloon, The Circle, and Crimson Gold, is currently serving a six-year prison sentence in Iran on vague anti-government charges. (The sentence, pronounced in January, also forbids him from making movies or writing scripts for the next 20 years!) Though he has always been subversive, with three of his features banned in Iran, Panahi is the victim of a travesty of justice that has ignited an international outcry. His silencing represents a major loss to world cinema, and one only has to watch his most recent feature, Offside, to see the proof. This film about young female soccer fans who disguise themselves as boys in order to sneak into a stadium where women are forbidden is one of the best films made anywhere during the last decade. Filmed during a World Cup qualifying match, the funny/sad/celebratory movie deftly blends documentary and fiction to make humanistic and political points without sacrificing entertainment value—or art. Subtitles. 35mm. 93 min.

Thursday, March 11, at 9:25 pm

DOGTOOTH

See 3/10 at 6:45 for description

Saturday, March 12, at 4:45 pm &

Sunday, March 13, at 6:30 pm

Chaplin’s Silent Films

A WOMAN OF PARIS

USA, 1923, Charles Chaplin

Chaplin has only a cameo in his first foray into serious filmmaking—a tale of a young French woman (Edna Purviance) who leaves her village and her true love to move to Paris, where she becomes the mistress of a cynical rich man (Adolphe Menjou). Stylish, sophisticated, and psychologically complex, the film impressed critics and influenced Lubitsch but proved a commercial flop, so Chaplin took it out of release for 50 years. When he reissued it in 1976 with a new music score that he himself composed, it was a triumph; Andrew Sarris proclaimed it the best film of that year! Preceded at showtime by Chaplin’s Sunnyside (1919), in which the comedian plays the daydreaming handyman at a rural hotel. New 35mm prints with music tracks. Total 112 min. janusfilms.com/chaplin/

Saturday, March 12, at 7:00 pm

25th Anniversary!

New 35mm Print!

SHOAH (PART 1)

France, 1985, Claude Lanzmann

Filmmaker Marcel Ophüls (The Sorrow and the Pity) has called Claude Lanzmann’s nine-and-a-half-hour Shoah “the greatest documentary on contemporary history ever released…and by far the greatest film I’ve ever seen about the Holocaust.” Shot in 14 countries over 11 years, and shown in two halves of 273 minutes and 290 minutes, this monumental work (the title is the Hebrew word for “Holocaust”) details how six million European Jews were systematically exterminated by the Nazis during WWII. Employing no historical newsreel footage, Lanzmann focuses his cameras on still-living witnesses to the genocide—perpetrators, bystanders, and camp survivors—and doggedly grills them about the details of mass destruction. He also revisits some of the now-peaceful, pastoral locations where, decades before, the horrors unfolded. There’s no question that Shoah (which will conclude on Sun., 3/13) represents a major expenditure of time and emotion. But it is essential viewing, and also best seen in the immersive environment of a movie theatre. Don’t miss this ultra-rare chance to see it that way. "#1 documentary of all time! A towering masterpiece…An ennobling theatrical experience.” –Joshua Rothkopf, Time Out New York. Cleveland revival premiere. Subtitles. 273 min. Part 2 shows tomorrow at 1:00 pm. Special admission to both parts $20; members and CIA students & staff $15. Tickets must be purchased on Saturday night before the start of Part 1. Admission to either part $12; Cinematheque members and CIA students & staff $9. No passes, twofers, or radio winners. No second film discount on 3/12. Cash/check only; no credit cards.

Sunday, March 13, at 1:00 pm

SHOAH (PART 2)

See 3/12 at 7:00 for description. 290 min.

Sunday, March 13, at 6:30 pm

A WOMAN OF PARIS

See 3/12 at 4:45 for description

Monday, March 14, at 7:00 pm

Paul Schrader Week!

BLUE COLLAR

USA, 1978, Paul Schrader

Richard Pryor, Harvey Keitel, and Yaphet Kotto play Detroit auto workers who, disrespected by both management and labor bosses, decide to rob their union’s headquarters—a bigger mistake than they know. Blue Collar was the directorial debut of ace screenwriter Paul Schrader (Taxi Driver, De Palma’s Obsession, et al.), and the Michigan native shot it in Kalamazoo. “Very probably the most clear-sighted movie ever made about the ways that shopfloor workers get fucked over by ‘the system’.” –Time Out Film Guide. New 35mm color print from the Universal Pictures studio archive! 114 min. Paul Schrader appears in person on Friday, March 18.

MARCH 17-20

Thursday, March 17, at 6:45 pm

Paul Schrader Week!

AFFLICTION

USA, 1997, Paul Schrader

One of Paul Schrader’s most acclaimed and honored films won an Academy Award for James Coburn and an Oscar nomination for Nick Nolte. Based on a Russell Banks novel, the film tells of a troubled small-town New Hampshire policeman (Nolte) and his volatile relationships with his abusive father (Coburn) and ex-wife and daughter. With Sissy Spacek, William Dafoe, and Mary Beth Hurt. 35mm. 114 min. Paul Schrader appears in person on Friday, March 18.

Friday, March 18, at 7:30 pm

A Special Event!

Paul Schrader in Person!

25th Anniversary!

Shot-in-Cleveland Rock ‘n’ Roll Movie

LIGHT OF DAY

USA, 1987, Paul Schrader

Tonight we’re proud to welcome acclaimed writer-director Paul Schrader to the Cinematheque. In his illustrious 35+ year career, Schrader has written such films as Taxi Driver, Obsession, and Raging Bull, and directed movies ranging from American Gigolo and Mishima to Patty Hearst and Auto Focus. 25 years ago Schrader was in Cleveland shooting a rock ‘n’ roll movie at the Euclid Tavern and other University Circle/East Side locations. Light of Day (the title comes from a Bruce Springsteen song written for the film) stars Michael J. Fox and Joan Jett as the brother and sister lead performers in a working-class Cleveland rock band. The film focuses on the siblings’ on- and off-stage lives. He is a factory worker who loses his job; she is an impoverished unwed mother whose reckless lifestyle has alienated her from her deeply-religious mother (Gena Rowlands). Though Schrader readily admits that the film is “flawed,” it is also fascinating—especially for Clevelanders. The Time Out Film Guide says that “what at first seems just another dreary blue-collar melodrama turns out to be something infinitely superior…Create(s) a powerful feeling of real lives being lived and lost.” Never released on DVD, Light of Day features a cameo by young Trent Reznor, who can be seen playing with other members of Exotic Birds, his pre-Nine Inch Nails band (here called the Problems). Schrader will answer audience questions after the screening. 35mm. 107 min. Special admission $15; members and CIA students & staff $10; no passes, twofers, or radio winners.

Saturday, March 19, at 5:15 pm &

Sunday, March 20, at 6:30 pm

Chaplin’s Silent Films

THE GOLD RUSH

USA, 1925/1942, Charles Chaplin

Chaplin’s greatest silent feature finds the Little Tramp a gold prospector in the frozen Yukon, where he battles the elements, bears, hunger, and loneliness. One of the funniest comedies ever made (shown here in a version with narration and music by Chaplin). Preceded at showtime by Chaplin’s A Day’s Pleasure (1919), about an ill-fated family outing. Jackie (The Kid ) Coogan co-stars. New 35mm prints! Total 91 min. janusfilms.com/chaplin/ Kids 12 & under $6.

Saturday, March 19, at 7:10 pm &

Sunday, March 20, at 4:00 pm

WINSTON CHURCHILL: WALKING WITH DESTINY

USA, 2010, Richard Trank

This glowing portrait of Britain’s legendary, WWII-era prime minister touches upon his early warnings about Hitler, Nazism, and anti-Semitism; his inspirational wartime speeches; and his legacy for the 21st century. Narrated by Ben Kingsley. “Classy…An informative look back at one of the 20th century’s most celebrated figures….Wholly upbeat.” –The L.A. Times. Cleveland premiere. 35mm. 101 min. www.moriahfilms.com

Saturday, March 19, at 9:15 pm &

Sunday, March 20, at 8:20 pm

20th Anniversary!

New 35mm Print!

Todd Haynes’ First Feature!

POISON

USA, 1991, Todd Haynes

The groundbreaking first feature by the director of Safe, Far from Heaven, and I’m Not There is a landmark of the New Queer Cinema. Inspired by the transgressive work of Jean Genet, the film tells three different stories in three different styles. “Hero” is a TV-style documentary about suburban patricide; “Horror” renders a sex experiment as a 1950s monster movie; “Homo” is a prison drama focused on the relationship between two inmates. No one under 17 admitted! 85 min. www.zeitgeistfilms.com

Sunday, March 20, at 4:00 pm

WINSTON CHURCHILL: WALKING WITH DESTINY

See 3/19 at 7:10 for description

Sunday, March 20, at 6:30 pm

THE GOLD RUSH

See 3/19 at 5:15 for description

Sunday, March 20, at 8:20 pm

POISON

See 3/19 at 9:15 for description

MARCH 24-27

NO FILMS THU., MAR. 24

Friday, March 25, at 7:30 pm &

Saturday, March 26, at 9:10 pm

Cleveland Cult Film Festival 2

THE NOT-FOR-TV BLOOPER MOVIE

USA, 1978, various directors

The long version of the “Star Trek Blooper Reel” is just one part of this hilarious compilation of classic TV and movie outtakes. Also seen flubbing lines or reacting to unexpected on-set occurrences are Humphrey Bogart, Errol Flynn, Abbott & Costello, Johnny Carson, Red Skelton, Don Rickles, and Don Adams, among others. There are goofs from The Twilight Zone, The Dick Van Dyke Show, Gunsmoke, Hogan’s Heroes, Laugh-In, et al. And topping off the whole thing is Marv Newland’s classic 1969 animated short Bambi Meets Godzilla! 35mm. Total 90 min.

Friday, March 25, at 9:20 pm &

Saturday, March 26, at 7:00 pm

Cleveland Cult Film Festival 2

50th Anniversary!

PSYCHO

USA, 1960, Alfred Hitchcock

Welcome to the Bates’ Motel, where bedbugs are the least of your worries! With Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh, and Vera Miles. 35mm. 109 min.

Saturday, March 26, at 9:10 pm

THE NOT-FOR-TV BLOOPER MOVIE

See 3/25 at 7:30 for description

NO FILMS SUN., MAR. 27

APRIL 1-3

Friday, April 1, at 7:30 pm &

Saturday, April 2, at 9:30 pm

Cleveland Cult Film Festival 2

SHANTY TRAMP

USA, 1967, Joseph P. Mawra

This classic piece of Southern sleaze tells of a white-trash party girl (the shapely Lee Holland) who sleeps around and leaves destruction in her wake. But she really gets into a whole heap o’ trouble when it is discovered that she prefers a young black man to randy bikers, the lecherous local evangelist, or her drunken, abusive father. This mash-up of To Kill a Mockingbird, In the Heat of the Night, Elmer Gantry, and God’s Little Acre has something to offend everyone—even Northerners. Adults only! 35mm. 72 min.

Friday, April 1, at 9:05 pm &

Saturday, April 2, at 7:00 pm

Cleveland Cult Film Festival 2

30th Anniversary!

New 35mm Print!

RAGING BULL

USA, 1980, Martin Scorsese

Here’s a new print of one of the great modern movies—an electrifying portrait of middleweight prizefighter Jake LaMotta (Robert DeNiro), whose volatile demeanor and violent urges turn his family life into another kind of macho boxing ring. With Joe Pesci and Cathy Moriarty. Screenplay co-written by Paul Schrader (see 3/18). Adults only! 129 min.

Saturday, April 2, at 9:30 pm

SHANTY TRAMP

See 4/1 at 7:30 for description

NO FILMS SUN., APR. 3

APRIL 7-10

Thursday, April 7, at 6:45 pm &

Sunday, April 10, at 8:40 pm

New 35mm Print!

CLUNY BROWN

USA, 1946, Ernst Lubitsch

Never released on video or DVD in America, the last-completed film by the great Ernst Lubitsch (To Be or Not To Be, The Shop Around the Corner) is a hilarious spoof of the British class system set in pre-WWII England. It tells of an apprentice plumber (Jennifer Jones) who becomes a servant at a lavish country estate, where she befriends an impoverished Czech professor (Charles Boyer), a refugee. “Five stars (highest rating)…The famed Lubitsch touch keeps things light and frothy...This is as good as movies get.” –Time Out New York (12/14/10). “Gleefully risqué.” –The New Yorker. Cleveland revival premiere. 100 min.

Thursday, April 7, at 8:45 pm &

Saturday, April 9, at 5:00 pm

Chaplin’s Silent Films

THE CHAPLIN REVUE

USA, 1918-23, Charles Chaplin

Here’s a trio of Chaplin’s greatest three- and four-reel silent comedies, all with music scores by the director. Program includes: A Dog’s Life (1918), a tale of a tramp and a canine; Shoulder Arms (1918), a biting satire on war and the army; and The Pilgrim (1923), a controversial work in which Charlie plays an escaped convict who impersonates a preacher. (It was banned in Pennsylvania because it “made the ministry look ridiculous.”) Chaplin’s brother Sydney co-stars in all three films. New 35mm prints! Total 125 min. janusfilms.com/chaplin/ Kids 12 & under $6.

Friday, April 8, at 7:30 pm

The Silver Anniversary Screen

BRAKHAGE IN 35MM

USA, 1987-2003, Stan Brakhage

Stan Brakhage (1933-2003) is one of cinema’s most famous and important experimental filmmakers. His painterly and rhythmic abstract films (most of them intentionally silent) are glorious works of pure cinema. The vast majority of Brakhage’s movies were made on 16mm film, but occasionally he worked with larger-gauge formats like 35mm, 70mm, and IMAX. Tonight, in a rare and very special program, we present six of Brakhage’s short films that exist in stunning 35mm prints. Techniques in these works range from photography and collage to painting and scratching on film. Program includes: Garden of Earthly Delights (1981); Dante Quartet (1987); Interpolations (1995); the companion pieces Night Mulch and Very (2001); and Brakhage’s final film, Chinese Series (2003), which he completed in bed a few months before his death, scratching on spit-softened film emulsion with his bare fingernails. Filling out the program to feature length will be Ken Jacobs’ mind-blowing masterpiece Disorient Express (USA, 1996, 35mm), in which side-by-side mirror images of a train traveling down a mountain circa 1906 produce a careening, kaleidoscopic journey through a “Rorschach wilderness” (Jacobs). Total 61 min. Special admission $12; members and CIA students & staff $8; no passes, twofers, or radio winners.

Friday, April 8, at 9:00 pm &

Saturday, April 9, at 7:25 pm &

Sunday, April 10, at 4:00 pm

60th Anniversary!

New 35mm Color Restoration!

THE AFRICAN QUEEN

USA, 1951, John Huston

Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn star in this delightful adventure-romance set in central Africa during WWI, about a coarse, gin-soaked riverboat captain who escorts a prim British missionary downriver through natural hazards and enemy German strongholds. Bogart won his only Oscar for this performance, beating out Marlon Brando’s Stanley Kowalski. Script co-written by James Agee. “One of the most charming and entertaining movies ever made.” –Pauline Kael. 105 min.

Saturday, April 9, at 5:00 pm

THE CHAPLIN REVUE

See 4/7 at 8:45 for description

Saturday, April 9, at 7:25 pm

THE AFRICAN QUEEN

See 4/8 at 9:00 for description

Saturday, April 9, at 9:30 pm &

Sunday, April 10, at 6:30 pm

THE TIME THAT REMAINS

Britain/Italy/Belgium/France, 2009, Elia Suleiman

Filmmaker Elia Suleiman, who has been likened to Buster Keaton and Jacques Tati, makes deadpan, absurdist, non-polemical movies about the plight of his fellow Palestinians. (He also appears in them.) His latest feature, one of the most acclaimed foreign films of the past two years, concludes a loose trilogy begun with Chronicle of a Disappearance (1996) and Divine Intervention (2002). Suleiman’s wry, laconic new film spans six decades (from the founding of Israel in 1948 to the present) and is based on his father’s career as an Arab freedom-fighter and on his own childhood and youth in Israel. “Critics’ Pick…Presents a half-century of tragedy and turmoil as a series of mordant comic vignettes.” –The NY Times. Cleveland premiere. Subtitles. 35mm. 109 min. www.ifcfilms.com/uncategorized/the-time-that-remains

Sunday, April 10, at 4:00 pm

THE AFRICAN QUEEN

See 4/8 at 9:00 for description

Sunday, April 10, at 6:30 pm

THE TIME THAT REMAINS

See 4/9 at 9:30 for description

Sunday, April 10, at 8:40 pm

CLUNY BROWN

See 4/7 at 6:45 for description

APRIL 14-17

Thursday, April 14, at 7:00 pm

A Special Event!

Bill Plympton in Person!

IDIOTS AND ANGELS

USA, 2008, Bill Plympton

Tonight we’re pleased to welcome independent animator and cartoonist Bill Plympton with his latest hand-drawn feature film, his fifth. A two-time Oscar nominee (for Your Face and Guard Dog, two of over 30 shorts he had made), Plympton has a distinctive minimalist style in which pencil sketches come to surreal life, and pliable, putty-faced characters morph endlessly into grotesque variations of themselves, often suffering violence or other indignities. Plympton’s diabolically funny, subversive, and sometimes gross work has been seen for decades in film festivals, animation compilations, and on MTV; he has also done animated music videos for Kanye West and “Weird Al” Yankovic. Idiots and Angels follows a misanthropic barfly, an asshole everyman, who tries to stop himself from performing out-of-character good deeds after he sprouts a pair of wings. The film has no dialogue but there is music by Tom Waits, Pink Martini, and others. “Critics’ Pick…Plympton’s best animated feature…Suggests Toulouse-Lautrec by way of Charles Bukowski…Relentless and brilliant.” –The NY Times. Preceded by Plympton’s new short The Cow Who Wanted To Be a Hamburger (2010), which was short-listed for the 2011 Academy Awards. Plympton will answer audience questions after the screening. Adults only! Cleveland premiere. 35mm. Total 83 min. www.idiotsandangels.com Special admission $12; members and CIA students & staff $8; no passes, twofers, or radio winners. Both films show a second time on Sat., 4/16 at 9:05, without Plympton.

Friday, April 15, at 7:00 pm &

Sunday, April 17, at 8:20 pm

New 35mm Print!

Grafton Nunes introduces

THE GRAPES OF WRATH

USA, 1940, John Ford

Henry Fonda, Jane Darwell, and John Carradine (David and Keith’s dad) star in John Ford’s powerful film version of John Steinbeck’s novel, about a family of Oklahoma farmers who travel to California during the Great Depression to look for work. One of the first 25 "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant" films selected for the National Film Registry by the Library of Congress. The movie will be introduced on Friday night by Cleveland Institute of Art President Grafton Nunes, a film scholar and John Ford fan. 129 min.

Friday, April 15, at 9:45 pm &

Saturday, April 16, at 7:05 pm &

Sunday, April 17, at 4:15 pm

THE STRANGE CASE OF ANGELICA

O ESTRANHO CASA DE ANGÉLICA

Portugal/Spain/France/Brazil, 2010, Manoel de Oliveira

Called the best film of 2010 by J. Hoberman in The Village Voice, the latest movie by Portugal’s 102-year-old phenom Manoel de Oliveira is one of his best. (It also includes his first use of CGI). The movie tells of a loner photographer who is summoned one rainy night to photograph the recently-deceased daughter of a wealthy couple. Laid out in her wedding dress, this beautiful young woman comes alive for the photographer and smiles at him when he looks at her through the viewfinder. Immediately smitten, he retreats from the land of the living and finds himself drawn to the unknown netherworld beyond. “As funny and peculiar as its title promises. Putting his own eccentric spin on the myth of Orpheus, the last working filmmaker to have been born during the age of the nickelodeon offers a modest, ultimately sublime meditation on the photographic essence of the motion picture medium, as glimpsed in the half-light of eternity.” –J. Hoberman. A 2010 New York Film Festival selection. Cleveland premiere. Subtitles. 35mm. 97 min. www.cinemaguild.com/strangecase/

Saturday, April 16, at 5:15 pm &

Sunday, April 17, at 6:30 pm

Chaplin’s Silent Films

CHAPLIN MUTUAL MASTERPIECES

USA, 1917, Charles Chaplin

In 1916 and 1917, Chaplin directed and starred in 12 shorts for the Mutual Company—all of them masterpieces. This program contains the final four: Easy Street, in which Chaplin’s Little Tramp becomes a policeman in a rough neighborhood; The Cure, in which an alcoholic goes to a spa for rehab; The Immigrant, about a newly-arrived immigrant’s travails in America; and The Adventurer, in which Charlie plays an escaped convict who becomes a hero. Silent with music tracks. 35mm. Total approx. 90 min. Kids 12 & under $6.

Saturday, April 16, at 7:05 pm

THE STRANGE CASE OF ANGELICA

See 4/15 at 9:45 for description

Saturday, April 16, at 9:05 pm

IDIOTS AND ANGELS

See 4/14 at 7:00 for description. Bill Plympton will not be present.

Sunday, April 17, at 4:15 pm

THE STRANGE CASE OF ANGELICA

See 4/15 at 9:45 for description

Sunday, April 17, at 6:30 pm

CHAPLIN MUTUAL MASTERPIECES

See 4/16 at 5:15 for description

Sunday, April 17, at 8:20 pm

THE GRAPES OF WRATH

See 4/15 at 7:00 for description

APRIL 21-24

Thursday, April 21, at 6:45 pm

THE TIME WE KILLED

USA, 2003, Jennifer Todd Reeves

A young bisexual writer (Lisa Jarnot) holes up in her Brooklyn apartment, where she grows unhinged over a period of months, in this meditation on post-9/11 fear, paranoia, and despair by acclaimed abstract filmmaker Jennifer Reeves. Reeves’ multi-award-winning first feature is visually stunning, as one would expect. “A strong and humbling film, made for all of those who remember the nightmares.” –The Village Voice. Cleveland premiere. 16mm. 94 min. home.earthlink.net/~jennreeves/

Thursday, April 21, at 8:40 pm &

Saturday, April 23, at 9:40 pm

CELL 211

CELDA 211

Spain, 2009, Daniel Monzón

Winner of eight Goya Awards (Spanish Oscars) including Best Actor, Director, Screenplay, and Picture (it beat out last year’s Oscar-winner The Secret in Their Eyes) and nominated for eight others, this thrilling drama follows a novice prison guard who gets left behind by his fellow guards when a violent riot breaks out. He must pose as an inmate to survive. How good is this movie? Well, let’s just say that Hollywood is working on the English-language remake right now… “One of 2010’s 10 Best Foreign Films.” –Roger Ebert. Cleveland theatrical premiere. Subtitles. 35mm. 111 min. www.ifcfilms.com/uncategorized/cell-211

Friday, April 22, at 7:30 pm &

Saturday, April 23, at 5:15 pm

Chaplin’s Silent Films

THE KID

USA, 1921, Charles Chaplin

Chaplin’s Little Tramp adopts an ornery but adorable orphan boy (Jackie Coogan) in this stellar blend of comedy and pathos. Preceded at showtime by Chaplin’s 1921 short The Idle Class, in which a rich woman mistakes Charlie for her drunk husband. New 35mm prints, with music track. Total 86 min. janusfilms.com/chaplin/ Kids 12 & under $6.

Friday, April 22, at 9:15 pm &

Saturday, April 23, at 7:00 pm

OUTSIDE THE LAW

HORS-LA-LOI

Algeria/France/Belgium, 2010, Rachid Bouchareb

One of the five films nominated for this year’s Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film (maybe it won) is a historical epic about the struggle for Algerian independence waged in 1950s France. Three Algerian brothers now living in France—a militant revolutionary, a pacifist ex-soldier, and an underworld kingpin—come back together to help liberate their homeland. The latest movie from the director of the acclaimed Days of Glory (Indigènes) stars three of the actors from that Cannes prizewinner: Jammel Debbouze, Roschdy Zem, and Sami Bouajila. “Intensely dramatized…Makes effective use of Godfather storytelling theatrics. Grade A-.” –Entertainment Weekly. Cleveland premiere. Subtitles. 35mm. 138 min. outsidethelawfilm.com

Saturday, April 23, at 5:15 pm

THE KID

See 4/22 at 7:30 for description

Saturday, April 23, at 7:00 pm

OUTSIDE THE LAW

See 4/22 at 9:15 for description

Saturday, April 23, at 9:40 pm

CELL 211

See 4/21 at 8:40 for description

NO FILMS SUN., APR. 24

APRIL 28 – MAY 1

Thursday, April 28, at 6:45 pm &

Sunday, May 1, at 2:00 pm

AHEAD OF TIME

USA, 2009, Bob Richman

This acclaimed new documentary is a portrait of Ruth Gruber, who was born in Brooklyn in 1911, became the youngest Ph.D. in the world at 20, and then turned international foreign correspondent and photojournalist at age 24. In a career spanning more than seven decades, Gruber made news as much as she reported it—traveling to Alaska and the Soviet Arctic, escorting Holocaust refugees to America, covering the Nuremberg trials and the founding of Israel, and befriending Eleanor Roosevelt, Harry Truman, David Ben Gurion, and others. Gruber, interviewed at length in the film, is still lucid as she approaches her 100th birthday. “A case study in pioneering feminist courage, ambition and individualism.” –Time Out New York. “An inspiration for career women, certainly, but also for us all.” –The NY Times. Cleveland premiere. 35mm. 73 min. ruthgruberthemovie.com

Thursday, April 28, at 8:20 pm &

Saturday, April 30, at 9:45 pm

HOW I ENDED THIS SUMMER

KAK YA PROVYOL ETIM LETOM

Russia, 2010, Alex Popogrebski

Here’s the movie that beat out The King’s Speech, Black Swan, 127 Hours, and Another Year to be named Best Film at the 2010 BFI London Film Festival! (It also won the Golden Hugo for Best Film at last year’s Chicago Int’l Film Festival.) Set at a meteorological station on a remote island in the Arctic Circle, it focuses on the two men who live and work there—a grizzled, fiftyish veteran and a young, green college-grad. Their clashing lifestyles and failure to communicate result in a relationship as hostile as their surroundings. “Critics’ Pick…(A) gripping survival drama.” –The NY Times. Cleveland premiere. Subtitles. 35mm. 124 min. www.filmmovement.com/theatrical/

Friday, April 29, at 7:30 pm &

Saturday, April 30, at 5:15 pm

Chaplin’s Silent Films

CITY LIGHTS

USA, 1931, Charles Chaplin

In Chaplin’s last and most celebrated silent film, the Little Tramp befriends a blind flower girl and a drunken millionaire with hilarious and heartbreaking results. This is one of the most beloved movies of all time; Orson Welles once called it his favorite film, and both Stanley Kubrick and Andrei Tarkovsky ranked it fifth among their personal top ten. Legendary film critic James Agee proclaimed the film’s famous ending “the greatest piece of acting and the highest moment in movies.” Music score by Chaplin. New 35mm print! 87 min. janusfilms.com/chaplin/ Kids 12 & under $6.

Friday, April 29, at 9:20 pm &

Saturday, April 30, at 7:05 pm &

Sunday, May 1, at 3:30 pm

POETRY

SHI

South Korea, 2010, Lee Chang-dong

Winner of the Best Screenplay Award at the Cannes Film Festival as well as the Grand Bell Award (Korean Oscar) and Korean Critics Award for Best Picture, Lee Chang-dong’s follow-up to his acclaimed Secret Sunshine (showing 4/22 & 23 at the Cleveland Museum of Art) is another fascinating, multi-faceted, unsentimental portrait of a widow facing a host of problems. Here the main character is a 66-year-old woman who develops an interest in writing poetry while battling the onset of Alzheimer’s and raising an irresponsible teenage grandson involved in a horrendous crime. A 2010 New York Film Festival selection. “With an understated visual style and perfectly paced narrative, Mr. Lee has created a portrait of a woman who has, by the end, become an extraordinary vision of human empathy.” –The NY Times. Cleveland premiere. Subtitles. 35mm. 139 min. www.kino.com/poetry/

Saturday, April 30, at 5:15 pm

CITY LIGHTS

See 4/29 at 7:30 for description

Saturday, April 30, at 7:05 pm

POETRY

See 4/29 at 9:20 for description

Saturday, April 30, at 9:45 pm

HOW I ENDED THIS SUMMER

See 4/28 at 8:20 for description

Sunday, May 1, at 2:00 pm

AHEAD OF TIME

See 4/28 at 6:45 for description

Sunday, May 1, at 3:30 pm

POETRY

See 4/29 at 9:20 for description

Sunday, May 1, at 6:30 pm

The Silver Anniversary Screen

Filmmaker in Person!

AMATEUR NIGHT: HOME MOVIES FROM AMERICAN ARCHIVES

USA, 2011, Dwight Swanson

Think home movies are boring? Think again! This new compilation of 16 amateur films from 16 American archives offers a fascinating peek at the wealth of historical and cultural treasures buried in the neglected, disparaged realm of small-gauge cinema. Selected by Dwight Swanson of the Center for Home Movies in Baltimore and blown up to 35mm (often with music or narration added), the films in this unique program date from 1915 to 2005 and encompass comedy, drama, and animation in addition to family scenes and travelogues. Among the highlights: Alfred Hitchcock’s home movies; Arthur P. Howe’s Last Great Gathering of the Sioux Nation; Naokichi Hashizume’s Heart Mountain Relocation Center, about a WWII internment camp for Japanese-Americans; Nixon Visits Idaho Falls; and Wallace Kelly’s Our Day, a 1938 Kentucky home movie masterpiece listed on the Library of Congress’s National Film Registry (shown here with a new score by Rachel Grimes). Dwight Swanson will introduce and answer audience questions after the screening. “Magical…Remarkable.” –The Wall Street Journal. Ohio premiere. 84 min. Special admission $10, members and CIA students & staff $7; no passes, twofers, or radio winners. centerforhomemovies.org/amateurnight/

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