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Marla Ridenour on Sports

Why does Browns' offense awaken at end?

By Marla Published: November 21, 2010

For the past two weeks, the Browns offense has gone stagnant in the second half, only to awaken with a vengeance in the final minutes of the fourth quarter. Last week in an overtime loss to the New York Jets, the Browns tied the game with 44 seconds left in regulation before falling 26-20.

On Sunday, the furious rally fell short in a 24-20 loss at Jacksonville, ended by a Colt McCoy interception at the Jacksonville 3 with 5 seconds left. The Browns had marched from their own 20 to a first down at the Jaguars' 29, even though rookie McCoy was operating on an injured left ankle.

Browns coach Eric Mangini didn't think the tendency was bizarre.

"It's more something positive about Colt for his ability to move (the team) in that situation,'' Mangini said. "In that situation the scheme changes dramatically because they're playing the offense differently based on time and things like that.''

Tight end Evan Moore agreed with Mangini that it was more a reflection of McCoy's competitiveness. Moore has been a primary target in both McCoy's attempted rallies.

''He's never throwing in the towel. He's going to be there until the very end, he's going to be fighting,'' Moore said. "He did it again today, we just came up short.''

Browns receiver Chansi Stuckey said part of it had to do with opponents' defenses.

''They can't do much on defense,'' Stuckey said. "You're going to be in 2-high, 1-high or man-to-man, so you kind of know what's going on.''

Tight end Ben Watson said the Browns need to play with that same intensity earlier in the game.

"I guess we always gotta play like we've got to have it,'' Watson said. "I think we get to a point where we've got to have it, we just go for it. We need that same intensity and that same urgency during the game.''

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