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Yankees 7, Indians 6: Ryan Lewis’ 12 Walk-Off Thoughts on Francisco Lindor, Abraham Almonte

By Ryan Lewis Published: July 9, 2016

Here are 12 Walk-Off Thoughts after the Indians’ 7-6 loss to the New York Yankees Saturday night.

1. The Indians had a chance to win it in the ninth. They had a chance to do what so few teams have been able to do and overtake the back-end of the Yankees’ bullpen, that being Dellin Betances, Andrew Miller and Aroldis Chapman.

2. Tied 6-6 and with two runners on base with nobody out after Francisco Lindor singled and Mike Napoli walked, Carlos Santana grounded a ball to the left side that Didi Gregorius and Chase Headley each went for. As Gregorius was about to field it, Lindor ran into Headley and was called out for interference.

3. Instead of potentially having the bases loaded with no outs, Lindor was the first out—worst case, the Indians have two runners in scoring position. Miller struck out Jose Ramirez and Chapman struck out Juan Uribe to end the inning.

4. Lindor and Indians manager Terry Francona argued that Headley wasn’t really in the play, and that Gregorius was fielding the ball.

5. Said Francona, “Tom Hallion said that you have to allow the fielder a chance to field it. I was just telling him I didn’t think that was the guy fielding the ball. I went back and looked at it because I wanted to make sure. I think Frankie was watching Gregorius and then the ball, and then he looked up late and saw the third baseman and hit him hard. I think because there was such severe contact, I think it kind of a leads an umpire into the call. I just didn’t think that was his play. He was telling me it was, but he didn’t have a chance. So I really disagree there. That’s what I was trying to tell him. When you go see this, you’re going to see that Gregorius called it and took it. But it’s unfortunate. Very unfortunate. I can also see why it got called. I just didn’t quite agree with it. … You try to tell guys, ‘Run with your head up,’ which he did. He’s watching the guy making the play. The guy that wasn’t making the play, he ran into. That was kind of the point.”



6. Here’s Lindor on the play: “Ground ball, I was looking at the ball. I started running towards third base looking at the ball. When I turned my head, I knew they weren’t going to get me at third, I looked and he was right there and boom, I hit him. … I was running, I was looking at the ball and then I turned because I knew they weren’t going to get me and he was right there. After I talked to the umpire, I guess I messed up. … He said the rule protects the fielder, you have to give them the room to catch the ball. He was in the way to catch the ball. He probably wasn’t going to get it, but as an umpire he has to protect the fielder because that’s what the rule says.”

More: The good and bad from the Indians' first half

7. The play that made it costly came in the 11th. With a runner on first, Brian McCann ripped a double to right field. Abraham Almonte misplayed it, trying to cut it off. It got by him, and he was slow playing it off the wall. It allowed Ronald Torreyes to score all the way from first and give the Yankees their winning 7-6 lead.

8. Said Francona, “We’re in no doubles. He got over-aggressive. There’s a reason we’re in no doubles, to [prevent them]. He’s just got to go get it. Because they don’t score [if he plays it better]. Again, that was another, we talk about paying attention to detail, we didn’t do that sometimes today and it cost us.”

More: Jason Kipnis pulling the ball with success in 2016

9. Almonte’s misplay is the second in three games after he didn’t see the ball trickle away from McCann in Friday’s loss that would have brought home the tying run. It’s been a rough stretch since he was reinstated after his failed drug test that cost him 80 games.

10. Jose Ramirez went 3-for-5 with three RBI singles Saturday night. He just keeps hitting and now has a .297 batting average with 37 RBI.

11. Salazar was roughed up for six runs on eight hits in 5 2/3 innings. It wasn’t the ideal start heading into the All-Star break. Francona used the word “careless” to describe his outing.

12. Said Francona, “His stuff was good. I thought he was a little careless. 0-2 home run, a lot of 0-2 hits, threw a ball picking off first, probably the biggest play was when he tried to swat that ball going up the middle back-handed. Kip’s standing there, we’re out of the inning, and there’s no reason for him to do that, which we explained to him. I think the best word is a little bit careless.”

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Indians stumble in 11th, fall to Yankees 7-6

By Ryan Lewis Published: July 9, 2016

For the second time in three days, the Indians had to go through the brick wall that is the back end of the Yankees’ bullpen. This time, they were able to extend the game into extra innings but eventually fell once again in a 7-6 loss Saturday night.

With a runner on first and Tommy Hunter on the mound in the top of the 11th inning, Brian McCann ripped a double to right field that Abraham Almonte tried to cut it off but couldn’t and was delayed fielding the carom off the wall. That allowed pinch-runner Ronald Torreyes to score from first and put the Yankees on top 7-6.

Aroldis Chapman worked 2 1/3 scoreless innings to close the door on the Indians. In the bottom of the 11th, Jason Kipnis opened with a walk but was caught stealing for the second out and Mike Napoli struck out swinging to end the game.

Almonte’s misplay is the second in three games after he didn’t see the ball trickle away from McCann in Friday’s loss that would have brought home the tying run.

The Indians entered the seventh inning trailing 6-5 and having to go through the first leg of the Yankees’ three relief stalwarts Dellin Betances. Kipnis led off the inning with a double, and Jose Ramirez came through with his third RBI-single of the day to tie it 6-6.

The Indians had a chance to win it in the ninth but caught bad break. The Indians had two runners on with nobody out against Miller when Santana grounded a ball to the left side. As Didi Gregorius fielded it, Francisco Lindor ran into third basemen Chase Headley and was called out for interference. Instead of the bases being loaded with nobody out, Miller then struck out Jose Ramirez and Chapman struck out Juan Uribe.

Two innings later, the Yankees came away with the decisive blow.

The Indians twice grabbed early leads. In the first, Rajai Davis reached base after he was hit in the hand by a pitch, advanced to second with a sacrifice bunt, stole third base as catcher Brian McCann threw the ball back to starter CC Sabathia and scored on Santana’s RBI-single.

Following the first of two three-run innings for the Yankees, the Indians went ahead 4-3 in the third inning. Mike Napoli notched an RBI-single to left field, Santana drove in another with a double and Ramirez singled to right to score a third run.

The Yankees roughed up Danny Salazar in his final start before the All-Star break. Already with three runs across, the Yankees loaded the bases in the sixth to end Salazar’s day. With two outs, Dan Otero came on but allowed a bases-clearing triple to Brett Gardner, putting the Yankees up 6-5.

Salazar finished after 5 2/3 innings, allowed six runs on eight hits and struck out five.

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Indians 10, Yankees 2: Ryan Lewis’ 22 Walk-Off Thoughts on Mike Napoli’s mammoth home run, more

By Ryan Lewis Published: July 8, 2016

Here are 22 Walk-Off Thoughts after the Indians’ 10-2 win against the New York Yankees.

1. Mike Napoli hit an absolute bomb of a home run Friday night, one of the most prodigious in Progressive Field history. Along with Jim Thome’s 511-foot home run to Eagle Avenue in 1999 and Mark McGwire’s awe-inspiring shot off the scoreboard in 1997, Napoli’s homer was one of the most impressive in park history.

2. Just about everyone knows John Adams, the drummer at Indians games, and where he sits, which is atop the bleachers in the middle section. It’s a long way away, and Napoli just about hit it right into the drum. The ball hit 1-2 rows from the scoreboard and on one hop hit the bottom of the scoreboard, just in front of Adams.

3. Per Statcast, it had an exit velocity of 107 feet, a launch angle of 32 degrees and traveled 460 feet. It’s the longest home run by an Indians hitter this season.

4. Said Napoli, “I got a pitch up in the zone. I swing hard. Just caught it perfect. I don’t know, it’s a good game all around. Got a good performance out of [Corey] Kluber. Good first inning from the boys, so it’s a good win for us. … To be honest you really don’t feel it off the bat. You just, I don’t know. I can’t really explain it.”

5. Indians manager Terry Francona couldn’t, either. He joked that Napoli barley hit it out and then added, “Wow. I mean, I don’t know how you hit a ball that far. Obviously I don’t. That was fun to watch.”

6. Indians second basemen Jason Kipnis brought up Mark Reynolds, and one of his blasts to the bleacher seats. Said Kipnis, “Oh my gosh. If you remember Reynolds, that was the farthest one that we've seen—since I've been here at least, and that was about the seventh row up from the top, or fifth row, and over one section. That was up near the drummer. We haven't even seen in BP one go there. That was a fun one to watch.”
 

TFW your boy @MikeNapoli25 hits the scoreboard (on a bounce).

WATCH the moonshot: https://t.co/UUCME64evS pic.twitter.com/QLXtHb5K4z

7. Here was Trevor Bauer’s reaction caught on TV, presented without comment.
 

Same, @BauerOutage. Same. https://t.co/ogbN5lGNbQ #Crushed pic.twitter.com/6Fyne7xSmj

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Indians crush New York Yankees 10-2 behind Mike Napoli’s 460-foot home run, Corey Kluber’s dominance

By Ryan Lewis Published: July 8, 2016

Three home runs in the first inning and five total. A prodigious blast that nearly hit the scoreboard. An ace performance. Friday night had just about everything for the home sellout crowd in the Indians’ 10-2 trouncing of the New York Yankees Friday night.

It was the third sellout at Progressive Field this season and the second one this week. Fans among the 34,045 who wanted to see some power got their money’s worth and then some.

The Indians led off the bottom of the first inning with back-to-back home runs against Yankees starter Chad Green (1-2, 7.04 ERA). Carlos Santana belted his 20th home run of the season to right field, which already bests his 2015 season total, and Jason Kipnis followed with his 13th of the year to center field. It marked the first time the Indians began a game with back-to-back home runs since Kosuke Fukudome and Kipnis did so on Sept. 22, 2011.

The Indians weren’t done in the first. With two outs and Francisco Lindor on first base, Lonnie Chisenhall drove a two-run shot to right field to put the Indians on top 4-0.

In the third, Mike Napoli hit one of the longest home runs in Progressive Field history. With Green still on the mound, Napoli crushed a two-run home run to the top of the bleacher seats in left field. It bounced once and hit the bottom of the scoreboard and nearly hit John Adams, the famous Indians drummer, who sits atop the bleachers in the middle section. Per Statcast, it measured 460 feet and is the longest home run by an Indians hitter this season.

Along with Jim Thome’s 511-foot home run to Eagle Avenue in 1999 and Mark McGwire’s awe-inspiring shot off the scoreboard in 1997, Napoli’s homer Friday night is one of the most impressive in park history.

Lindor missed a home run in the fifth by a few feet but settled for an RBI-double, and Napoli added an RBI-single to make it 8-0 Indians. In the sixth, Yan Gomes grounded out to score Juan Uribe, who doubled.

In the 7th, a final home run, as Kipnis added his second of the night, this one to right field. The five home runs as a team mark the most for the Indians (52-34) in a single game this season.

It was easily enough for recent All-Star selection Corey Kluber (9-8, 3.61 ERA), who allowed one run on five hits in eight innings to go with eight strikeouts. Yankees (42-44) catcher Brian McCann hit a solo home run for Kluber’s only blemish. In the ninth, Joe Colon made his major-league debut, allowing one run and striking out one.

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Indians’ Tyler Naquin still rolling as a rookie; Indians trade Michael Martinez to Boston

By Ryan Lewis Published: July 8, 2016

Indians rookie outfielder Tyler Naquin has to had to survive at the major-league level this season, in more ways than one.

Aside from adjusting to major-league pitching, he’s also had to deal with the realities of the Indians organizing their active 25-man roster and the restrictions that at times come with it. Naquin earned a spot on the Opening Day roster and was then demoted twice as the Indians balanced needs with his own performance, which had mostly come with positive reviews.

In his third stint, which began June 1, Naquin has been on a tear, perhaps enough to begin to put his name into the discussion for American League Rookie of the Year. In that time, he’s hitting .330 with eight home runs, 16 extra-base hits and 18 RBI and was named the AL Rookie of the Month in June.

“I think he’s more confident. I think he should be more confident,” Indians manager Terry Francona said. “I think he has some survival instincts. What I mean by that, sometimes when you’re young trying to survive, he’ll take a couple swings where you’re like, ‘Uh oh.’ And then he’ll shoot one out of the ballpark.”

Because of the construction of the Indians’ roster, Naquin has had to fight his way into the lineup on a regular basis. So far, he’s done it.

“For a kid that didn’t play right away, [against] the lefties at the beginning of the season, got sent down, he has been unbelievably productive,” Francona said. “It kind of gets exciting because we knew he was learning on the run, and you never quite know what a young player is going to be. We still don’t know what [he’ll become]. But it’s kind of been fun to watch.”

Martinez dealt

The Indians are still dealing with the ramifications of their 19-inning game with Toronto last week. Now, it’s cost them their utility man off the bench, a useful piece in Francona’s game-to-game management.

Utility man Michael Martinez was recently designated for assignment when the Indians needed to call up pitcher Shawn Morimando as the bullpen ran thin. On Friday, he was dealt to the Boston Red Sox for cash considerations.

Martinez was able to play nearly every position on the field and had enough speed to act as a pinch runner. It afforded Francona a wide range of options in the later innings of games. Jose Ramirez is a similar player but with him in the starting lineup every day, the Indians don’t have that kind of a tool coming off the bench.

“We got put in a bind,” Francona said. “He’s a really good guy to have around. He actually was doing pretty well numbers wise, but he’s better than his numbers, his ability to move around the diamond and pinch run and play defense and be a really good teammate. I don’t think anybody was happy about [losing him].”

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Yankees 5, Indians 4: Ryan Lewis’ 16 Walk-Off Thoughts on Trevor Bauer, facing Aroldis Chapman, more

By Ryan Lewis Published: July 7, 2016

Here are 16 Walk-Off Thoughts on the Indians’ 5-4 loss to the New York Yankees.

1. As a baseball observer, watching Aroldis Chapman pitch is marveling. He’s the guy the Indians had to come back against trailing 5-4 in the bottom of the ninth. They made it interesting but came up short.

2. The sequence of pitches to Jose Ramirez was borderline unfair. Chapman threw three straight 103-mph fastballs—all three of which were fouled straight back—and then struck out Ramirez with a 90-mph slider that cut back over the plate. Facing Chapman is genuinely unique in a game that has some incredible pitching.

3. Dellin Betances and Andrew Miller are top-of-the-line relievers as well. The Indians trailed 5-3 when Betances entered the game in the sixth inning. Coming back agains those three is one of the tougher things to do in baseball.

4. Said Indians manager Terry Francona, “You know going in that they’re some of the best in the league. That doesn’t mean you’re not going to win. I thought we had some really good at-bats, but it’s certainly challenging. Any team, when you get down late, it’s hard, but those two guys at the end are pretty special. Looking at like combined 11 walks and maybe 140 strikeouts. I thought we had some pretty good at-bats.”

5. Mike Napoli started the ninth with a walk and with one out, Juan Uribe singled off Chapman. Rajai Davis lined a ball to left field that was caught. Tyler Naquin then nearly beat out a ball hit to the right side of the infield that would have loaded the bases, but Starlin Castro’s throw beat him to the bag by half a step.

6. Said Francona, “Nap’s at-bats are always (good). … To take the walk… Uribe, really, after the first two pitches, he kind of dialed it up a little bit. We had a lineout to left. We had some good at-bats. Naquin, that’s his first at-bat (against Champman) and I don’t think he’s probably seen too many guys like that in Triple-A, so I thought they did a pretty good job.”

More: Indians SP Corey Kluber named to All-Star team as injury replacement; Zach McAllister placed on 15-day disabled list

7. Naquin had himself a good game that was nearly a great one. He hit a solo home run in the second inning that put the Indians on top 1-0. It was his eighth of the season. Down 5-4, he singled with two outs in the seventh and stole second base to put the tying run in scoring position.

8. That brought up pinch-hitting Abraham Almonte, who struck out and didn’t see the ball trickle away from Brian McCann. If he does see it, he would have been easily safe at first. Naquin, in a head’s-up play, saw that Betances wasn’t covering home and rounded. Instead of an inning-ending strikeout, if Abraham sees the ball, the Indians tie it 5-5.

9. Said Almonte, “It was a curveball down. When I swung, I was a little bit up the line. I didn't figure out right away that he dropped the ball, so I picked it up a little bit late.”

10. Said Francona, “If he sees it, he’s safe at first. Naquin did a great job of base-running. If he sees it, he gets there easily and it would be first and third and we still got a chance, which would be great. Perfect world, he saw it just a hair sooner, we get the call at first and Naquin scores.”

11. Either way, Naquin is building a legitimate American League Rookie of the Year candidacy. He’s had some ups and downs in center field defensively, but he’s consistently hit above .300 and even .320 and now has added some power to go with it. If Almonte sees the ball or Castro’s throw is a step slower, he would have had a much louder game.

12. Trevor Bauer was hit around, but mostly on singles back up the middle. The Yankees tied it 2-2 in the fifth and then took a 5-2 lead in the sixth on four singles and a sacrifice fly.

13. Bauer isn’t always in the best mood—somewhat understandably—after a loss or a poor outing. Thursday night was the quietest he’s been, limiting his answers to 40 words on four questions.

14. Said Bauer, “Gave up a lot of weak singles. …  Throw it right where I did (on the home run allowed). … Best stuff and command I’ve had in a long time for the whole game. … Yeah because we lost. We haven’t lost a whole lot when I’m pitching.”

15. It was the first time in several outings Bauer didn’t throw a terrific outing. He had built momentum. He was visibly frustrated on the mound as single after single went by him and into center field.

16. Francona liked what he saw in the first three innings, saying, “They were really sharp, good innings. They were aggressive with his fastball and it looked like too many fastballs caught too much of the plate, probably elevated a little bit too. They came kind of in a hurry. He was really good early. I don’t think Trevor tires and things like that because his arm is in such good shape. I thought it was mostly fastballs that were catching too much.”

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Indians fight back but fall to New York Yankees 5-4

By Ryan Lewis Published: July 7, 2016

Trying to erase a deficit in the latter innings isn’t easy against any team. Doing it against the New York Yankees this season has proven to be nearly impossible.

The Indians tried to fight that uphill battle but came up just short in a 5-4 loss Thursday night.

The Indians entered the sixth inning trailing 5-2. Facing Yankees starter Ivan Nova (6-5, 5.18 ERA), Carlos Santana and Jason Kipnis led off the inning with back-to-back doubles. A wild pitch made it 5-3, but Francisco Lindor grounded out to first base and couldn’t get Kipnis home from third.

Enter Dellin Betances, the first piece to the Yankees’ three-headed bullpen monster. He induced Mike Napoli to ground out to third, this time scoring Kipnis, and then struck out Jose Ramirez to end the inning with the lead in-tact.

In the seventh, Tyler Naquin—who homered earlier in the game—singled and stole second with two outs to put the tying run in scoring position. Betances then struck out pinch-hitting Abraham Almonte for the third out. The ball trickled away from catcher Brian McCann, but Almonte didn’t realize it in time. Naquin would have come all the way around to score, but McCann’s throw beat Almonte by the step to end the seventh.

Andrew Miller worked a 1-2-3 eighth inning. In the ninth, the Indians made it interesting against Aroldis Chapman and his 103-mph fastball.

Mike Napoli walked and with one out, Juan Uribe singled to put two on for Rajai Davis, who drove a ball to left field that was caught by Brett Gardner. With two outs, Naquin lined a ball that was stopped by first basemen Mark Teixeira. Second basemen Starlin Castro picked it up and threw to first, beating Naquin by a half-step to end the game.

Earlier, the Indians (51-34) had taken a 2-0 lead but fell behind, putting them in the unenviable position of overtaking the Yankees’ bullpen.

Naquin put the Indians up 1-0 in the third inning with a solo home run to right-center field, his eighth of the season, to continue his American League Rookie of the Year bid. Three batters later, Jason Kipnis drove his 12th home run of the season, another solo shot, to center field. He hit nine home runs all of last year.

The Yankees (42-43) tied it in the fifth and took the lead in the sixth against Indians starting pitcher Trevor Bauer (7-3, 3.30 ERA). Didi Gregorius, who was involved in the trade that brought Bauer to Cleveland, sent a solo shot to right field to make it 2-1. After two singles, Gardner tied it with a single of his own up the middle.  

In the sixth, three consecutive singles, the last by Chase Headley, put the Yankees on top 3-2. Rob Refsnyder’s sacrifice fly scored another run and ended Bauer’s day in favor of Dan Otero. Jacoby Ellsbury singled off Otero to cap the Yankees’ scoring and put them on top 5-2.

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SP Corey Kluber named to All-Star team as injury replacement; Indians now have three All-Stars

By Ryan Lewis Published: July 7, 2016

The Indians will now have three representatives at next week’s All-Star game in San Diego, as starting pitcher Corey Kluber has been named to the American League team as an injury replacement.

Kluber will be replacing Toronto’s Marco Estrada, who has been placed on the 15-day disabled list. It’s the first All-Star selection for Kluber, the 2014 AL Cy Young Award winner.

“It was definitely an honor,” Kluber said. “I think anybody that plays baseball, pays attention to baseball grew up watching the All-Star Game. It’s something that everybody has paid attention to over the years. And to be able to experience one first-hand will be a pretty cool experience.”

This season Kluber 8-8 with a 3.79 ERA and 114 strikeouts in 114 innings pitched, but like last season, his advanced statistics have remained solid. Among qualified starters, his 2.96 FIP leads the AL, per FanGraphs. He’s also tied for the AL lead with 3.1 WAR, along with Chicago’s Jose Quintana.

“I think it's nice that, one, for Klubes personally I think it's awesome,” Indians manager Terry Francona said. “I think it kind of shows that the league is recognizing his body of work, not just this year, but the last two years. I think if you look at his peripheral numbers, he's at the top of the league in a number of categories. And I'm glad that it was recognized.”

Kluber will be making the trip to San Diego with shortstop Francisco Lindor and fellow starting pitcher Danny Salazar, meaning 40-percent of the Indians’ starting rotation will be represented.

“I think Danny and I were the two fortunate enough to be selected, but I think [you] could have made a case for anybody,” Kluber said. “I think with what the starting staff has been able to—and really the pitching staff as a whole has been able to do so far this year has been really impressive. I think we’re definitely looking to not just do it for a half year, but to continue to do it for the entirety of the season.”

Bullpen moves

The Indians on Thursday placed relief pitcher Zach McAllister on the 15-day disabled list with right hip discomfort and optioned Mike Clevinger back to Triple-A Columbus. In their places, relievers Austin Adams and Joe Colon were promoted.

McAllister felt discomfort while warming up in Toronto last weekend. He has dealt with this before, and with the All-Star break upcoming, the Indians wanted to take advantage of the timing of it.

“I don't think it's anything that we thought was necessarily like a 15-day, but with the All-Star break coming, we can use that to our advantage,” Francona said. “Let him rest up for a couple days, get him some side days, because we need to get him back to pitching the way he can. He's important in our bullpen and that's become a little bit inconsistent, so we can use this to our advantage.”

McAllister has had some strong stretches of scoreless appearances but has also had some big innings, like his past two appearances in which he’s given up seven earned runs in 1 1/3 innings. Overall this season he owns a 5.40 ERA and 1.613 WHIP in 26 2/3 innings pitched. Now, with the hip injury, the Indians will allow him to rest for about two weeks.

“It just kind of flared up on me and [I haven’t been] able to pitch the way I expect to,” McAllister said. “Better off nipping it in the bud now than let it [be] something that lingers.”

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SP Corey Kluber named to All-Star team as injury replacement; Indians now have three All-Stars

By Ryan Lewis Published: July 7, 2016

The Indians will now have three representatives at next week’s All-Star game in San Diego, as starting pitcher Corey Kluber has been named to the American League team as an injury replacement.

Kluber will be replacing Toronto’s Marco Estrada, who has been placed on the 15-day disabled list.

This season Kluber 8-8 with a 3.79 ERA and 114 strikeouts in 114 innings pitched, but like last season, his advanced statistics have remained solid. Among qualified starters, his 2.96 FIP leads the AL, per FanGraphs. He’s also tied for the AL lead with 3.1 WAR, along with Chicago’s Jose Quintana.

It’s the first All-Star selection for Kluber, the 2014 AL Cy Young Award winner.

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Indians’ streaks against Tigers, at home come to an end in 12-2 loss

By Ryan Lewis Published: July 6, 2016

If records were meant to be broken, then streaks were meant to end. On Wednesday afternoon, the Indians lost a hold on two winning streaks in a 12-2 loss to the Detroit Tigers.

The loss snapped an 11-game winning streak against the Tigers in 2016 and a 13-game home winning streak.

Prior to it, the Indians had dominated the Tigers in the first 11 games to the tune of  a run differential of +53 (77-24). The Tigers finally got to the Indians then some on Wednesday.

“They out-played us today,” said Francisco Lindor. “They played better than us. That’s pretty much it. Every other time we played, we played better than them. Today, they played better than us. They hit more than us, they out-pitched us, they played defense better than us. That’s pretty much it.”

Indians starting pitcher Josh Tomlin was perfect through three innings before his outing became unraveled in the fourth and fifth innings. With the Indians leading 2-0, the Tigers took the lead in the fourth and then kept piling on.

Cameron Maybin hit a two-run home run off the foul pole in the fourth to tie it 2-2. Later Justin Upton put the Tigers on top with a sacrifice fly to center field, scoring Victor Martinez, who doubled.

Things got worse in the fifth after Tomlin started the inning with two strikeouts. Miguel Cabrera singled home two runs to make it 5-2 and Nick Castellanos delivered the knockout blow a few batters later, belting a three-run home run over the wall in center field to end Tomlin’s day.

The Tigers added on in the seventh against Zach McAllister and TJ House to the tune of four more runs via two-run hits by Castellanos and Steven Moya, all charged to McAllister.

The Indians took an early lead against Tigers starter Michael Fulmer on sacrifice flies by Lonnie Chisenhall in the second and Lindor in the third. But that was all the Indians could muster as the Tigers, for the first time this season, looked like the Tigers of 2013-15 against the Indians.

“The team has played very consistent,” Lindor said of the 11-game streak. “We were very consistent the whole year. I’m happy for that. We have a long way to go still. We have to continue to pound the strike zone, hit the good pitches, play defense, continue to do the small things. At the end of the year, we’ll see how we do.”

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