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National news briefs — compiled Sept. 7

NEW YORK

Shooting suspects held

A man who allegedly shot a toddler to death in his stroller on a Brooklyn street is being held without bail on a charge of second-degree murder. Daquan Breland, 23, pleaded not guilty at his arraignment Saturday. Prosecutors say he fatally shot 16-month-old Antiq Hennis on Sept. 1. Breland and Daquan Wright, 19, were arrested in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. on Friday and returned to New York. Wright was awaiting arraignment. Authorities say Antiq’s father was pushing him in a stroller while crossing a street in the Brownsville neighborhood when shots were fired. The child was struck on the left side of his face and later pronounced dead at a hospital. Police believe the boy’s father was the intended target.

SCARAMENTO, CALIF.

Wildfire enters 4th week

As a gigantic wildfire in and around Yosemite National Park entered its fourth week Saturday, environmental scientists moved in to begin assessing the damage and protecting habitat and waterways before the fall rainy season. Members of the federal Burned Area Emergency Response team were hiking the rugged Sierra Nevada terrain even as thousands of firefighters still were battling the blaze, now the third-largest wildfire in modern California history. Federal officials have amassed a team of 50 scientists, more than twice what is usually deployed to assess wildfire damage..

ANCHORAGE, ALASKA

Researchers rescued

Two researchers and their pilot were rescued Friday from a remote Alaska volcano after freezing rain left thick ice on their helicopter’s blades. Alaska State Troopers spokeswoman Megan Peters said the rescue came at 5 p.m. Friday. The three were caught in a freezing rainstorm Wednesday evening. Pilot Sam Egli, United States Geological Survey geophysicist John Paskievitch, and University of Alaska-Fairbanks researcher Taryn Lopez were not injured. They were attempting to monitor volcano equipment when “the weather moved in,” Egli said. The work is part of an assignment to also repair permanent monitoring equipment on volcanoes in the area known as the Valley of 10,000 Smokes.

Compiled from wire reports.



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