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Pilot in deadly Connecticut wreck survived earlier crash

By Michael Melia
Associated Press

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HARTFORD, CONN.: The plane accident that killed four people in a Connecticut neighborhood was not the first crash for the pilot, a former Micro­soft executive who was taking his teenage son on a tour of East Coast colleges.

The pilot, Bill Henningsgaard, was killed along with his son, Maxwell, and two children who were in a house struck by the small propeller-driven plane on Friday.

Four bodies were recovered from the wreckage and sent to the Connecticut medical examiner’s office for identification.

East Haven police on Saturday released the names of the crash victims, including Henningsgaard, 54, of Medina, Wash.; his 17-year-old son; 13-year-old Sade Brantley and 1-year-old Madisyn Mitchell, who lived in the East Haven home hit by the plane.

National Transportation Safety Board investigator Patrick Murray said Saturday the plane was upside down when it struck a house at about a 60 degree angle. He said the pilot was making his first approach to the airport and did not declare an emergency before the crash.

After removing the wreckage and before analyzing any data, he said at a news conference in New Haven, “We don’t have any indication there was anything wrong with the plane.”

A preliminary NTSB report on the crash is expected within 10 business days. A more in-depth report could take up to nine months.

Henningsgaard, a highly regarded philanthropist, was flying a small plane to Seattle in 2009 with his mother when the engine quit. He crash-landed on Washington’s Columbia River.

“I forced myself to confront that fact that the situation any pilot fears — a mid-air emergency, was happening right then, with my mother in the plane,” he wrote in a blog post days later.

In the Connecticut crash, Hennings­gaard was bringing the 10-seater plane, a Rockwell International Turbo Commander 690B, in for a landing at Tweed New Haven Airport in rainy weather just before noon when the plane struck two small homes, engulfing them in flames. The aircraft’s left wing lodged in one house and its right wing in the other.

As the children’s mother yelled for help from the front lawn, several people in the working-class neighborhood raced to rescue the children, but they were forced to turn back by the fire.

A neighbor, David Esposito, was among those who raced to help the children’s mother. He said he ran into the upstairs of the house, where the woman believed her children were, but he couldn’t find them after frantically searching a crib and closets.

He returned downstairs to search some more, but he dragged the woman out when the flames became too strong.


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