All CATEGORIES
☰ Menu


Some circumstances surface in KSU fraternity suspension

By Carol Biliczky
Beacon Journal staff writer

Print
Add This

The Kent State fraternity suspended last month for hazing may have caned and paddled students and required them to do errands for others.

A KSU officials’ report indicated that there was “circumstantial evidence” that Kappa Alpha Psi engaged in physical violence and mental anguish.

The information, included in public documents provided to the Beacon Journal, shows that the fraternity has a checkered history at the university.

In February 2011, for instance, the university required the fraternity to set up risk-management procedures for event setup and cleanup, staffing and security because of unspecified events that took place on Jan. 21, 2011, in Streetsboro.

The university has stripped the fraternity of its right to hold parties, seek new members or conduct business in recent years.

Problems reached a peak in October when KSU suspended the primarily black fraternity for three years. The letter does not indicate what members did to warrant the reprimand.

Timeka L. Thomas Rashid, associate dean of students, told chapter president Ade Adesanya that she reviewed the hazing allegation and six years of the fraternity’s files before agreeing with an investigative committee to suspend the group.

The Kappas “have not taken advantage of advisement and continue to abandon expectations,” the committee reported to Rashid.

A similar chapter at the University of Akron was revoked in 2002, according to a letter from a fraternity official in Cleveland Heights.

Charles S. Dawson warned UA officials in 2011 that the chapter was illegal and any attempted initiations should be reported to him for criminal prosecutions.

The fraternity became the first black organization on the Kent campus in 1949.

Carol Biliczky can be reached at cbiliczky@thebeaconjournal.com or 330-996-3729.


Print
Add This


MORE IN NEWS MORE IN NEWS >
EDITORS' PICKS

OHIO.COM VIDEOS

Most Read Stories