Akron

 



Free Site Subscriptions

Subscribe by RSS

Subscribe by Email


Pets Blog

Adopting a Holiday Dog

By Grant Published: December 7, 2009

I had a great day on Saturday. Much of it was spent at a dog adoption day with the Stark County Pound. The event was two-fold: 1) was to help adopt some of the great dogs they have there that need a home. 2) was to help raise money for Friends of the Pound. This organization supports the adoption efforts of the pound. The money they raise helps sponsor (pay for) the spay and neuter of some of the dogs that come through.

It was fun to see all the dogs and how they each react to their environment. One thing I always relate to my dog obedience clients is that if you are "shopping" for a warm and furry companion to bring home:

Do Your Homework.

It is so easy to "fall in love" with a dog that somehow pulls your heart strings (more on this in a minute). The dog adoption facilities I am familiar with in this area all have nice areas outside where you can spend some time with the dogs and play/interact a bit. Utilize that space and time to your benefit! I think the first best rule in finding a "forever dog" for your home shouldn't be like running to the store to get milk, yet I see it happen all the time. People say, "Yeah, we're gonna run out Saturday morning and find a dog". YIKES. "Run" says it all. They're in a hurry. Maybe the parents promised Billy or Susie a dog for whatever reason. The worst thing you can do is rush. When we looked for Lexi, our German Shepherd, it took us over three weeks. We went to MANY pounds and visited many people that were offering for private adoption.

The entire "owning a dog" experience is expensive, in dollars, but in time as well. Tell the kids, "we'll go looking on Saturday, but we will NOT bring a dog home." MOST facilities allow you to put a hold on a dog for a few days. It gives you a chance to visit a couple other places and see what else is out there.

Utilize the trip to the pound as a family experience. Use the car ride to talk about responsibilities. Who will care for the dog? How will it be done? Where will you buy food? How much will you have to spend on toys, food, beds, kennels and more. Do you have $500 to spend on a pet in the next six months (you probably will)? There is very little in this world with as big a pay-off as the undying, uncomplicated love a dog has for us, but remember your responsibilities! I LOVE dogs and will likely always have at least one, but understanding my ownership responsibilities, I TOTALLY know what I'm getting in to (usually).

If one of the primary owners (assuming a spousal-type relationship in the home) doesn't want the dog, ASSUME NOW that person will likely drag their feet to engage and help with care/feeding/training/etc. They may not care as much to be "on" the training as much as you, possibly even to the point of undermining your efforts. Might be a great time to evaluate THAT relationship before you start another one? And just so you know, yes I AM a professional dog obedience trainer, but even though I'm often asked, NO, I DON'T DO SPOUSAL training!! THAT would be interesting, eh? Maybe not!

On the point of starting another relationship... I hear all the time, "Well, our dog has {this issue: Fill in the blank!}, so we're gonna get another dog to help fix it."

It is NOT the responsibility of one dog to "fix" another one. YOU ARE THE PACK LEADER, it is YOUR responsibility.

Yes, a calm-submissive balanced dog can HELP another dog achieve that same energy, but the pack leader and the pack leader alone controls that. NEVER bring a new dog into an unstable pack. And parents, that pack can be just the humans involved and have nothing to do with other dogs. Dogs understand energy and KNOW when they are in an unbalanced home.

Well, I feel like I'm rambling. Dog adoption is something I am very passionate about in many ways as I see the bad side often in our training business. So I'll finish the story I promised above. During a slow period of "Dog Adoption Day", I went back to see what larger breed dogs were available. One of our services is to help choose and train a dog for a client then introduce them to their new home with their new skill-set in place. I've got a current request for a dog to fill, so I am looking for the "right" dog for this client. Well, THAT dog wasn't there, but in the first cage was this German Shepherd (probably a mix) with the most beautiful tan/brown eyes that just sucked me in. As a trainer, I can tell a lot about a dog through their eyes, how they watch, what they focus on. Any slight collar tug with this dog (out in that "learn about your dog" area above) and she would look right at me as if to say, "yup, I'm paying attention, what do ya want me to do/learn?" And her personality is JUST like Lexi's.

You know the ending already, I'm guessing. I now own two German Shepherds. In less than a day, she already has three new commands and is responding to the name I gave her this morning. Wicked smart.

As you think about a dog for a holiday gift, keep in mind the upheaval that is the holidays. Not a great time to bring a dog home. Choose carefully, consciously, and download this PDF, it might help! Till next week.

_______________

Grant Holmes is a Dog Obedience Professional and the owner of Perfectly Pawsible Dog Obedience & People Training. He loves working one on one with your dog in your home, working on the goals you've set for obedience & behavior! Any dog, any size, any challenge.

Print
Add This
  |



Stories via email

Sign up to receive a daily email containing new posts published on pets.ohio.com.

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner


Pet Events
Add your pet-related event