HOSPITALS

Summa Health accreditation

Summa Health on Monday said it had earned the Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval for Hospital Accreditation by demonstrating continuous compliance with its performance standards.

The Gold Seal of Approval is a symbol of quality that reflects an organization’s commitment to providing safe and effective patient care, Summa said in a news release.

Akron-based Summa Health said the health system underwent a rigorous, unannounced on-site survey last fall. During the review, a team of Joint Commission expert surveyors evaluated compliance with hospital standards related to several areas, including emergency management, environment of care, infection prevention and control, leadership, and medication management. Surveyors also conducted on-site observations and interviews.

“Summa Health is very pleased to receive accreditation from The Joint Commission,” said Dr. Cliff Deveny, interim president and CEO of Summa Health.

WALL STREET

Dow rebounding from slide

Stocks powered higher Monday, sending the Dow Jones industrial average up 410 points, as the market clawed back more of its massive losses from the previous two weeks.

The Standard & Poor’s 500, the benchmark for many index funds, gained 36.45 points, or 1.4 percent, to 2,656. The Dow climbed 410.37 points, or 1.7 percent, to 24,601.27.

The Nasdaq composite advanced 107.47 points, or 1.6 percent, to 6,981.96. The Russell 2000 index of smaller-company stocks rose 13.15 points, or 0.9 percent, to 1,490.98.

OIL/GAS

Exxon settlement upheld

A New Jersey appeals court on Monday turned down a request from environmental groups and a former state senator to undo a $225 million pollution settlement between the state and Exxon Mobil.

Appellate Division Judge Carmen Messano, writing on behalf of the three-judge panel, said that the trial judge had not made a mistake in judgment when he approved the deal in 2015. The ruling means that the environmental groups and former state Sen. Raymond Lesniak have — for now — failed in their effort to tear up a 2015 agreement between Republican Gov. Chris Christie’s administration and the Texas petroleum company. The groups and Lesniak instead wanted the state to extract more money from Exxon, reflecting the $8.9 billion that the state had earlier estimated it was owed.

E-COMMERCE

Amazon to cut some jobs

After a ramp-up of hiring last year, Amazon says it will cut a “small” number of positions at its Seattle headquarters.

The company did not give an exact number, but the Seattle Times, citing a person familiar with the cuts, says they affect a few hundred people. That would be a small percentage of the 40,000 people Amazon employs at its headquarters, and an even smaller proportion of its 566,000 employees worldwide.

In a statement, Amazon.com Inc. says it is still hiring aggressively in some areas and will consider those affected for other roles.

Amazon’s head count grew rapidly last year, up 66 percent from 2016. Some was because of its acquisition of Whole Foods and its 89,000 jobs, but Amazon also says it hired 130,000 people last year.

AUTOS

Air bag danger list expands

Ford and Mazda are adding more than 35,000 pickup trucks in North America to a list of vehicles that should not be driven because they have Takata air bag inflators with a high risk of exploding.

The warning includes 33,428 Ranger and 1,955 Mazda B-Series small pickups from 2006 model year, according to both companies. Ford, which made the B-Series for Mazda, found test results showing that the trucks had inflators that ruptured or recorded high internal pressure readings.

The companies and the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said dealers will tow the pickups to service bays to replace the faulty inflators.

Compiled from staff and wire reports.