Dan Brandt still has $32,000 in student loan debt, after earning his bachelor’s degree in marketing, but he’s not worried about paying it back.

That’s because Brandt chose a major and a career with that debt in mind.

“Money is a big deal for a 17-year-old kid that has nothing,” said Brandt, who graduated from Augsburg University in Minneapolis in 2011 with $55,000 in student debt. “I knew the salary ranges in marketing could make a nice living, but I was more concerned with finding a place I enjoyed working at,” adds Brandt, who is now a marketing manager at Best Buy’s headquarters.

If you don’t know what you want to study, you can choose a major that won’t leave you with student loans you can’t repay.

Explore job prospects

Start by listing your interests and skills. There may be a clear fit — if you’re adept with numbers, for example, you might consider accounting.

Next, research careers by matching a major to one of the “Occupation Groups” listed in the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Outlook Handbook. Each group lists positions along with descriptions, educational requirements and projected job growth. Consider contacting your college’s career office to link up with alumni who studied what you’re interested in, to see their career path.

Research potential pay

Your major could make a big difference in lifetime earnings: The disparity between the lowest- and highest-paying majors is $3.4 million, according to a 2015 report by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.

Research median salaries rather than average salaries.

The average starting salary for the class of 2017 was $50,516, according to the National Association of Colleges and Employers Summer 2018 Salary Survey, but median earnings — where half earn more and half earn less — start at $27,000, according to 2014 research by The Hamilton Project.

Calculate expected loans

Before you take out student loans, submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, to qualify for gift and earned aid, including grants, scholarships and work-study. Find private scholarships with scholarship search engines, such as the U.S. Department of Labor’s CareerOneStop scholarship finder or Scholarships.com.

If you need loans and you’re not sure how much to borrow for college, you can keep repayments manageable by aiming for a monthly payment that won’t be over 10 percent of your expected after-tax take-home pay each month in your first year after school.

When in doubt, switch

If you start school without your major picked, it’s OK. College is the place to explore potential career paths.

Realize that if you do change your path, it could take longer to complete your degree, which may mean taking on more debt. But it could also lead to a career that motivates you, potentially boosting your earnings and the ability to repay your loans.