They share a property line, but the psychological gap between them is wider than the Grand Canyon.

If you’re an avid reader of this column — and if not, off with your head! — you will remember my report on the Battle of Cuyahoga Falls, in which a resident who accuses her neighbors of building a fence on her property has spent the last few years exchanging insults, threats, curses, raised middle fingers and police reports.

If you’re not an avid reader, here’s the short version.

Donna Laughlin lives next door to Jim and Lisa Barnhart. As the property-line dispute escalated and their relationship deteriorated, she hired a surveyor to confirm her claim that they had built the fence on her property. The surveyor said she was right: Along its entire run, the fence encroached from four feet to almost six feet.

I was intrigued not so much by quarreling neighbors, who are a dime a dozen in any community, but by the fact that the Cuyahoga Falls Law Department sent a formal letter to the Barnharts ordering them to move the fence or face criminal charges.

“Each day that you remain in noncompliance is a separate offense,” it read.

But when the Barnharts ignored the city, the city went away. Today the law department says its attorneys needed awhile to figure out they couldn’t bring criminal charges in this type of situation, and that the matter had to be addressed as a civil case.

At the time, I couldn’t get ahold of the Barnharts because they no longer have the landline that was in a report and a message to his employer was not passed along. By contrast, I am easy to contact because my number is at the bottom of every column. And the Barnharts very much wanted to contact me after reading Laughlin’s version.

Essentially, the two sides don’t agree on anything. I’m not going to rehash every claim and counterclaim, because there are dozens, but here’s a key example — and, to the Barnharts, proof that Laughlin has been unreasonable:

• Jim: “ When I first bought the house 10½ years ago, I was going out to mow and Donna recognized me, because we went to the same church in Stow when I was in high school. She came out and said hi. So I said, ‘Where do I mow? How far do I go?’ Her words to me were, ‘We’ve always used the tree line as the property line.’ ”

• Donna: “False. I knew it was up to the cable box.”

Jim Barnhart said the full extent of the dispute hasn’t been conveyed. The bickering involves not only Laughlin and the Barnharts, but also several neighbors who Barnhart says have been consistently harassing him and his wife.

Among them, he says, is a woman across the street who cut a circular hole in her window screen to better photograph any property incursions — he showed me a cellphone picture of the screen — and another woman who, while shooting a video of Barnhart on her iPad, extended her middle finger. He has a photo of that, too.

(Very impressive. It’s not easy to hold up an iPad and flip the bird simultaneously. Let’s give her credit for manual dexterity.)

Will this ever end? I’d be surprised.

For a brief period last week, I thought we’d have a resolution.

Jim Barnhart told me he is sick of the whole thing and said he would pay $1,500 to relocate his fence if Laughlin would get her surveyor back out to mark exactly where the property line is. The property lines do not run at 90-degree angles and, because one of the pins is inside his fence and was inaccessible to the surveyor, he wants to be certain.

After I passed several messages back and forth between the two parties, Barnhart offered to split the cost of bringing back the surveyor, which Laughlin had estimated at $60. So I emailed her and said, “Wouldn’t it be worth $30 to put this whole thing to rest?”

Her response: “I will NOT pay for a surveyor to come out when he has a copy of the survey. All he needs to do is read the survey. If he has anything else to say, have him talk with me instead of going through you.”

Well excuse me for trying to broker a solution.

Seems we may have identified which neighbor is being more unreasonable.

Bob Dyer can be reached at 330-996-3580 or bdyer@thebeaconjournal.com. He also is on Facebook at www.facebook.com/bob.dyer.31