I knew they were out there, but I didn’t think they were this close.

As I told you Sunday, campaigns are afoot in at least seven states to do away with daylight saving time, that precious annual gift that brings us sunnier evenings during the best parts of the year.

The genius leading the fight in Texas told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram, “There’s 24 hours in a day and that’s how many we should have.”

Well, that makes a lot of sense. As if every day between daylight saving time and daylight squandering time is being reduced. It’s one 23-hour day.

I’d expect that from a Texas legislator. But I was shocked and appalled — shocked and appalled, I tell ya — to learn that some of my very own readers don’t like daylight saving time.

Their biggest beef? Apparently, they lack the ability to adapt to change.

Example:

“Our bodies are conditioned over the winter to wake at a certain time and go to bed at a certain time,” wrote Philip Mazi on Facebook. “I still have to be in my office at 6 a.m., which now feels like 5 a.m.

“Ever heard of jet lag? Very similar.”

Exactly! I assume some of you Princes of Darkness have flown to the West Coast and survived. That’s a three-hour difference. And then a few days later, you fly home and have to adapt to another three-hour difference.

So why can you survive that but not a one-hour change twice a year?

Fortunately for me, a couple of readers calmed me down by tickling my DST funnybone.

Bob: I liked your column and agree with you, with one little minor suggestion.

When we fall back, we should gain an hour on Sunday morning. When we spring ahead, we should lose the hour on Monday afternoon.

Is there any reason that we can’t change the clocks at 2 p.m. Monday, rather than 2 a.m. Sunday — only in the spring, of course? Please check on this.

Karen Lefton

Karen: Best idea I’ve heard for a long, long time!

I’m hoping your law firm will take on this project —pro bono.

FARM FRESH

Bob: I’m not one of those people who see that DST serves much purpose anymore. However, I talked with a farmer once who claimed his crops do much better with the extra hour of daylight.

Gene Keener

Gene: The farmer must be sleep-deprived.

CLOCKED OUT

Bob: I don’t care which way it goes, but just keep the same all year! The time in my car is wrong six months out of the year!

Lynn Kelly

Lynn: Two words: owner’s manual.

MAGIC TRIP

Bob: I enjoy driving from Uniontown (EST) to visit my family in Nashville (CST) because they think I’m from the future ...

Scott Dority

Scott: That explains why you look so old when you come home ...

WRONG TURN

Bob: Perhaps you should check out [Sunday’s] Page Two of the newspaper of our suburb to the north in which are cited scientific studies that are opposed to your views on DST.

For my part, I view the issue as akin to the fellow who cut off six inches from the top of his blanket to sew to the bottom in order to lengthen it.

Bob Dill

Bob: Why are you read­ing that awful pub­lication? Shame on you!

But seriously ... the Plain Dealer’s unsigned tirade against DST claims research has shown either tiny or nonexistent effects on energy use. The blurb also claims the “latest research suggests the time change can be harmful to our health. ...

“Researchers have found it can be dangerous to mess with sleep schedules.”

Good Lord! You’d think we go to bed at exactly the same time every night and get up at exactly the same time every morning.

Most of us get significantly different amounts of sleep, for all kinds of reasons — travel schedules, early appointments, illness, work crises or particularly enjoyable late-night recreational activities.

And why, exactly, do we have to be sleep-deprived on Time Change Sunday? If you usually get up at 9, sleep until 10! Big whoop!

Bob Dyer can be reached at 330-996-3580 or bdyer@thebeaconjournal.com. He also is on Facebook at www.facebook.com/bob.dyer.31