BIRMINGHAM, Ala.

Thousands without power

The soggy remnants of Alberto moved toward the nation’s interior Tuesday, leaving scattered flooding and downed trees in the wake of the year’s first named tropical storm. More than 25,000 power outages were reported in Alabama, many caused by trees rooted in soggy soil falling across utility lines. But while forecasters said the subtropical depression could dump as much as 6 inches of rain inland, few major problems were reported so far.

ELLICOTT CITY, Md.

Flooding victim found dead

Searchers on Tuesday scouring a river alongside a historic Maryland town ripped apart by flash flooding found the body of a man last seen being swept away by the raging waters as it gutted shops and pushed parked cars into swollen tributaries. Volunteers and crews with trained dogs had been methodically hunting for 39-year-old Eddison Hermond. He disappeared late Sunday afternoon, following torrential rains that prompted destructive flash flooding in historic Ellicott City.

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico

Study disputes death toll

A new study contends that many more deaths than normal occurred in Puerto Rico in the three months after Hurricane Maria devastated the island, mostly because of problems getting medicines or medical care. Researchers surveyed a small sample of neighborhoods and from that estimated that up to 4,600 more deaths than usual occurred, far more than earlier studies have suggested. At least one independent expert questioned the methods and the number in the new study. “This estimate could be off by thousands. Easily,” Donald Berry, a professor of biostatistics at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, said.

BOSTON

Goat head placed on car

A woman woke up to find a gruesome sight on her car in the Boston neighborhood of Hyde Park. The woman found a bloody goat head on her car hood early Tuesday morning with a photo of herself tucked under the windshield wiper blades. Police say she drove her car about half a mile to the Hyde Park branch of the Boston Police Department with the grisly scene still intact. No suspects have been arrested.

SACRAMENTO, Calif.

Pesticide found in pot

An alarming increase in the use of a highly toxic and banned pesticide at illegal marijuana farms hidden on public land in California is leading U.S. and state officials to team up on an issue that recently divided them: pot. They announced Tuesday that they will use $2.5 million in federal money to target illegal grows even as they remain at odds over the drug and other issues. Federal law still bans pot, but U.S. Attorney McGregor Scott said he will prioritize illegal weed rather than going after the recreational marijuana market.

Beacon Journal/Ohio.com wires