DETROIT

No cap on GM payments

When compensation expert Kenneth Feinberg announces the terms of General Motors’ plan to pay victims of crashes caused by bad ignition switches, he’ll have freedom. Feinberg is scheduled to reveal the terms Monday, and GM chief executive officer Mary Barra has said there will be no cap on payments. Also, GM won’t have any say in Feinberg’s awards, she told a U.S. House subcommittee during a hearing earlier this month. The company says the faulty switches are responsible for at least 54 crashes and more than 13 deaths, but lawyers and lawmakers say the death toll is closer to 100, with hundreds of injuries. That would send GM’s payments into the millions, if not billions of dollars. GM had a $27 billion cash stockpile as of March 31. So far, it has announced or taken charges of $2 billion for recall expenses.

loS ANGELES

Mars technology tested

A saucer-shaped NASA vehicle launched by balloon high into Earth’s atmosphere splashed down in the Pacific Ocean on Saturday, completing a mostly successful test of technology that could be used to land on Mars. Since the twin Viking spacecraft landed on the red planet in 1976, NASA has relied on the same parachute design to slow landers and rovers after piercing through the thin Martian atmosphere. The $150 million experimental flight tested a novel vehicle and a giant parachute designed to deliver heavier spacecraft and eventually astronauts.

ATLANTA

Suspect does death research

A Georgia man charged with murder after his 22-month-old son died in a hot SUV searched online for information about kids dying in cars and told police he feared it could happen, according to documents released Saturday as the boy’s family held his funeral in Alabama. The warrants released by the Cobb County Police Department provide more insight into the investigation of Cooper Harris’ death on June 18. Justin Ross Harris, 33, has told police he was supposed to drive his son to day care that morning but drove to work without realizing that his son was strapped into a car seat in the back.

SEATTLE

Marijuana shortage expected

The state of Washington’s Liquor Control Board has been warning of shortages when the first legalized marijuana stores open. The board plans to issue the first 15 to 20 retail licenses July 7, with shops allowed to open the next day if they’re ready. Board staff said only one store in Seattle is ready for final inspection. Only 79 of the more than 2,600 people who applied for growing licenses last fall have been approved.

Compiled from wire reports