CHARLOTTE, N.C.

Mourners honor Rev. Graham

Thousands of people from all walks of life — including a former president — filed slowly past the casket of the Rev. Billy Graham on Monday to pay their final respects to a man who reached millions with his message of salvation through Jesus Christ. A light drizzle greeted mourners on hand at 8 a.m. when the doors opened to Graham’s boyhood home, but it had tapered by the late afternoon when former President George W. Bush arrived with his wife, Laura. The viewing was expected to last late into the night for the famed evangelist, who died Wednesday at age 99.

BOSTON

Bill Cosby’s daughter dies

Bill Cosby’s 44-year-old daughter, Ensa Cosby, died in Massachusetts from kidney disease, a spokesman for the comedian said Monday. Spokesman Andrew Wyatt did not immediately offer other details about her death on Friday. “Please keep the Cosby family in your prayers and give them peace at this time,” he said. Bill Cosby lost another of his five children in 1997 when his 27-year-old son, Ennis, a graduate student at Columbia University, was shot to death while changing a flat tire near a freeway off ramp in Los Angeles. A 22-year-old man was later convicted and sentenced to life in prison.

NEW YORK

Deadly attack remembered

The World Trade Center’s operators apologized Monday to relatives of people killed in the 1993 bombing there, saying the country was unprepared for a terror attack that foreshadowed 9/11. The families urged people to understand its legacy. Victims’ families, survivors, first responders and others marked the bombing’s 25th anniversary on what is now the Sept. 11 memorial plaza. They observed a silent moment, read victims’ names, laid roses on the memorial and reflected on an explosion that became a telling signal of terrorists’ aims.

Court targets discrimination

Ruling in the case of a gay skydiving instructor, a federal appeals court in New York on Monday became the second one in the country to declare that U.S. anti-discrimination law protects employees from being fired over their sexual orientation. The decision could set the stage for an appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court to settle the question once and for all. In a 10-3 ruling, the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said that while it and other courts around the U.S. previously found that Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act didn’t cover sexual orientation, “legal doctrine evolves.”

Beacon Journal/Ohio.com wires