TULSA, OKLA.

HIV tests recommended

Health officials on Thursday urged thousands of patients of an Oklahoma oral surgeon to undergo hepatitis and HIV testing, saying unsanitary conditions behind his office’s spiffy facade posed a threat to his clients and made him a “menace to the public health.” State and county health inspectors went to Dr. W. Scott Harrington’s practice after a patient with no known risk factors tested positive for both hepatitis C and the virus that causes AIDS. Inspectors found employees using dirty equipment, reusing drug vials and administering drugs without a license. Harrington voluntarily gave up his license and closed his offices in Tulsa and suburban Owasso and is cooperating with investigators, said Kaitlin Snider, a spokeswoman for the Tulsa Health Department.

COUPEVILLE, WASH.

Landslide jitters continue

The ground on a scenic Washington state island continued to move Thursday, one day after a massive landslide wiped out a hillside overlooking Puget Sound. “It still has a bit of slippage here and there,” said Terry Clark of the Island County Emergency Management Department. “It can be a handful of dirt to a barrel-full. It’s still an active event.” One home was destroyed in Wednesday’s slide on Whidbey Island, 50 miles north of Seattle. Another 33 homes were evacuated. By Thursday, five remained under evacuation orders or a potential order. Another 18 homes weren’t accessible by road but could be accessed by boat, Clark said. No one was injured.

NEW YORK

City appeals soda ruling

New York City is asking appeals judges to reinstate a ban on supersized sodas and other sugary drinks, which was struck down by a Manhattan judge the day before it was to go into effect. The city had vowed an appeal and said Thursday that lawyers had filed it late Monday. In his decision on March 11, State Supreme Court Justice Milton Tingling said the 16-ounce limit on sodas and other sweet drinks arbitrarily applies to only some sugary beverages and some places that sell them. “The loopholes in this rule effectively defeat the stated purpose of this rule,” Tingling wrote in his ruling, which was seen as a victory for the beverage industry, restaurants and other business groups.

Compiled from wire reports.