WASHINGTON: The Trump administration is preparing to restore the flow of surplus military equipment to local law enforcement agencies under a program that had been sharply curtailed by the Obama administration amid an outcry over police use of armored vehicles and other war-fighting gear to confront protesters.

Documents obtained by the Associated Press indicate President Donald Trump plans to sign an executive order undoing an Obama-era directive that restricted police agencies’ access to the gear that includes grenade launchers, firearms and ammunition.

Trump’s order would fully restore the program under which “assets that would otherwise be scrapped can be repurposed to help state, local, and tribal law enforcement better protect public safety and reduce crime,” according to the documents.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions could outline the changes during a Monday speech to the national conference of the Fraternal Order of Police in Nashville, Tenn., a person familiar with the matter said. The person insisted on anonymity to discuss the plan ahead of an official announcement.

National police organizations have long pushed Trump to hold to his promise to once again make the equipment available to local and state police departments, saying it is needed to ensure officers aren’t put in danger when responding to active shooter calls and terrorist attacks. An armored vehicle played a key role in the police response to the December 2015 mass shooting in San Bernardino, Calif.

President Barack Obama issued an executive order in 2015 that curtailed the program after public outrage over the use of military gear when police confronted protesters in Ferguson, Mo., after the shooting death of Michael Brown, 18.

Tweets on NAFTA, wall

Meanwhile, Trump accused Canada and Mexico of being “very difficult” at the negotiating table over the North American Free Trade Agreement, and threatening anew to terminate the deal.

Trump tweeted on Sunday morning that NAFTA is the “worst trade deal ever made.”

The president said at a rally this month in Phoenix that he would “end up probably terminating” NAFTA “at some point.”

The U.S., Mexico and Canada began formal negotiations earlier this month to rework the 23-year-old trade pact that Trump blames for hundreds of thousands of lost U.S. factory jobs.

Trump is also taking to Twitter to press the need for his promised southern border wall, tweeting that Mexico will pay for it “through reimbursement/other.”

Mexico’s Foreign Relations Ministry responded to Trump’s comments Sunday by reiterating that Mexico will never pay for a border wall and that it will not renegotiate NAFTA via social media or the press.