Struggling Red Sox pitcher Clay Buchholz is being moved to the bullpen and left-hander Eduardo Rodriguez will take Buchholz’s spot in the rotation, starting Tuesday at Baltimore.

Buchholz is 2-5 with a 6.35 ERA in 10 starts and has allowed five earned runs or more six times. He gave up season-highs of six runs and three home runs in Thursday’s 8-2 loss to Colorado.

Rodriguez (right knee) is on the 15-day DL and has not pitched for the Red Sox this season.

Rodriguez is 0-3 with a 3.54 ERA in five rehab starts at Triple-A Pawtucket. He went 10-6 with a 3.85 ERA as a rookie in 2015.

Manager John Farrell said Buchholz will make multi-inning appearances in order to remain stretched out and could return to the rotation later in the season.

Rangers-Jays brawl

Rangers second baseman Rougned Odor started serving his suspension Friday for punching Toronto’s Jose Bautista after the penalty was reduced from eight to seven games.

Bautista was suspended for one game, and he was serving that Friday, when the penalty was upheld a day after his appeal was heard.

The Rangers promoted former top prospect Jurickson Profar from Triple-A Round Rock, and he was in the lineup against the Pirates as the leadoff hitter playing second base. Odor had been leading off.

Odor punched Bautista in the jaw in the top of the eighth inning of that May 15 game in Arlington after Bautista made a hard takeout slide at second base on Odor, which started the bench-clearing brawl.

Domestic violence

Braves outfielder Hector Olivera agreed to accept a suspension through Aug. 1 for his arrest on domestic violence charges.

The suspension is without pay and covers 82 games, retroactive to April 30.

Olivera was arrested April 13 at a hotel outside Washington, D.C., charged with assault and battery of a woman, and he was immediately placed on leave.

Agreeing with the police report filed in Arlington, Va., Manfred’s office finished an investigation that concluded Olivera was responsible for visible bruises on the woman’s body.

A police spokeswoman said at the time that Olivera and the woman were acquainted.

MLB officer retires

Jonathan Mariner is leaving his job as Major League Baseball’s chief investment officer.

The commissioner’s office said Friday his departure takes effect May 31. Mariner, the highest-ranking minority employee at the central office, worked for MLB for more than 14 years.

Commissioner Rob Manfred lauded Mariner for helping MLB maintain its level of financial stability.

Mariner was largely responsible for overseeing the league’s $1.5 billion pension plan and its strategic investment fund. He also put in place a leaguewide financial reporting system.