• Chippewa Garden Club Garden Mart, 1-5 p.m. Sunday, Squire Rich Museum’s Corn Roast, 9367 Brecksville Road, Brecksville. Garden sale including used garden items, tools, pots and crafts. Call Kathy at 440-570-4820 or go to http://www.chippewagardenclub.com.

• Gardeners of Greater Akron, 5:30 p.m. Monday, St. George Fellowship Centre, 3204 Ridgewood Road, Copley. Member horticulture show. Dinner at 6:30 p.m. $13. For more information, go to https://gogagrows.wordpress.com.

• Summit County Master Gardeners: Meet Me in the Garden Series, 7 p.m. Wednesday, F.A. Seiberling Nature Realm, 1828 Smith Road, Akron. Learn how to incorporate herbs into the landscape and use for cooking and medicinal applications. Free. http://www.summitmastergardeners.org.

• Leaf & Blossom Flower Show, 2-7:30 p.m. Thursday, Cuyahoga Falls Public Library, 2015 Third St. One-day flower show will include horticultural specimens and exhibition arrangements with the theme Come Grow With Us. Free. 330-928-2117.

• Hops Field Night, 5-9 p.m. Thursday, OSU South Centers Endeavor Center & Research Building, 1862 Shyville Road, Piketon. Tour will include information on hops trellis systems, mechanical harvesting, drying, disease and pest management, nutrients and fertilization demonstration, drip irrigation and more. $15. To register, call Charissa Gardner at 740-289-2071, ext. 132, or email [email protected].

• Rain Barrel Workshop: Seven Hills, 6-7:30 p.m. Thursday, Seven Hills Recreation Area, 7777 Summitview Drive. Learn how to harvest rainwater for garden needs and to combat stormwater pollution by constructing a rain barrel. Free workshop; $60 for barrel. For more information or to register, go to http://www.cuyahogaswcd.org/events/2018/08/23/rain-barrel-workshop–seven-hills.

• Chippewa Garden Club “Bees in Your Backyard,” 7 p.m. Aug. 28 at Brecksville Human Services building, 2 Community Drive. Denise Ellsworth will educate participants on native bee populations that need protection. For more information, go to http://www.chippewagardenclub.com.

Ohio No-Till Field Day, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 29 at Fisher Auditorium, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster. Anyone interested in learning about keeping Ohio soils healthy and the newest and best ways to do just that. The agenda is full of experts, researchers, farmers, agri-businesses, and diverse topics. To register, go to http://go.osu.edu/notillfielday.

• Rain Barrel Workshop: Brooklyn Heights, 6-7:30 p.m. Aug. 29, Brooklyn Heights Community Center, 225 Tuxedo Ave. Learn how to harvest rainwater for garden needs and to combat stormwater pollution by constructing a rain barrel. Free workshop; $60 for barrel. For more information or to register, go to http://www.cuyahogaswcd.org/events/2018/08/29/rain-barrel-workshop–brooklyn-heights.

• Preparing Your Garden for Winter, 6:30-8 p.m. Aug. 30, Soil and Water Conservation District, 6970 State Route 88, Ravenna. Portage County Master Gardened Volunteer Lynn Bogel will teach about fall gardening strategies to improve soil health and reduce weeds and pathogens. Free. To register, call 330-296-6432 or email [email protected].

• Rain Barrel Workshop: Berea, 6:30-8 p.m. Aug. 30, Coe Lake Pavilion, Berea. Learn how to harvest rainwater for garden needs and to combat stormwater pollution by constructing a rain barrel. Free workshop; $60 for barrel. For more information or to register, go to http://www.cuyahogaswcd.org/events/2018/08/30/berea-rain-barrel-workshop.

Send information on home and garden events to [email protected].

• Greater Akron Orchid Society, 6:30 p.m. Monday at Portage Lakes Kiwanis, 725 Portage Lakes Drive, Coventry Township. Edgar Stehli will lead an orchid mini-class from 6:45-7 p.m. Jim France from Oakwood Orchids of Dayton will present Lycastes, Sudamerlycastes, and Idas, Oh My! Call Dave at 330-307-7189 or go to http://www.thegaos.com.

• Forages Field Day, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Thursday at Ward Campbell Farm, 11440 Palmyra Road., North Jackson. Learn about crops and forages. 330-533-5538 or http://go.osu.edu/foragefieldday2018.

• Chippewa Garden Club Garden Mart, 1-5 p.m. Aug. 19, Squire Rich Museum’s Corn Roast, 9367 Brecksville Road, Brecksville. Garden sale including used garden items, tools, pots and crafts. Call Kathy at 440-570-4820 or go to http://www.chippewagardenclub.com.

• Summit County Master Gardeners: Meet Me In The Garden Series, 7 p.m. Aug. 22, F.A. Seiberling Nature Realm, 1828 Smith Road, Akron. Learn how to incorporate herbs into the landscape and use for cooking and medicinal applications. Free. http://www.summitmastergardeners.org.

• Hops Field Night, 5-9 p.m. Aug. 23 at OSU South Centers Endeavor Center & Research Building, 1862 Shyville Road, Piketon. Tour will include information on hops trellis systems, mechanical harvesting, drying, disease and pest management, nutrients and fertilization demonstration, drip irrigation and more. $15. To register, call Charissa Gardner at 740-289-2071, ext. 132, or email [email protected].

Send information on home and garden events to [email protected].

Trees. All my life I’ve been looking for trees such as these. No, not Lorax trees, but trees here in Ohio and throughout the United States. Everlasting wonders.

But first: The time of the corn has come; my wife Laura goes over the Chatscape and through the lawn and past the strawberry fields and down to the Orchard to get the fresh sweet corn. And tomatoes are coming in. And cucumbers. And peaches. And early apples.

Now that I mention corn, the fields and harvests here in Ohio amaze, but on July 14, only 10 days beyond the old “knee-high by the Fourth of July,” we traveled through Iowa. Laura posed in front of Iowa corn, not the height of her knees, but twice her entire height. Zeapers!

Let us have a brief diversion to bagworms on trees and shrubs. These interesting insects feed on many host plants, from oaks to maples, pines to planetrees, but most commonly on evergreens such as juniper and arborvitae. Years ago, I saw them with their caterpillar heads out for a feed on junipers at a Pennsylvania rest area, then using their juniper food, blue cones and all, to construct their “bags.”

Then this week in Orrville I saw numerous bags on another host plant, arborvitae. Left unchecked, bagworms can seriously damage or kill evergreens. So pick a time and pick some bagworms off the trees before the bags become bigger, and eventually become a bag of eggs set to hatch next spring.

Now back to the trees. Here is an All-Star lineup from recent observations, featuring a profile of one of my favorites.

Kentucky coffeetree (Gymnocladus dioicus). This is increasingly becoming one of my favorite landscape trees. It is tough. It has a stark appearance that really works in the winter street tree environment, with fluted, sparse branching (the genus name of Gymnocladus means “naked stems”). It was once, for almost two decades, the state tree of Kentucky, yielding to the prior and now present Kentucky state tuliptree.

It is in the Fabaceae (bean) family, and its lima-bean-shaped seeds were brewed like coffee by Native Americans and European settlers. It is reputed to be a poor substitute for Coffea arabica and C. canephora, which we think of as true coffee, but which are not true beans. Seeds of Kentucky coffeetree are toxic to humans (and some animals) unless roasted.

Kentucky coffeetree is a native tree, a tough urban survivor in streetscapes, tolerant of limey soils and tree pits (Chicago urban foresters list it as one of their five toughest street trees). Its sparse appearance, fairly early fall defoliation and late spring foliation make it perfect if long seasons of sun penetration are desired.

The leaves are huge, 1 to 3 feet long, though the axillary buds that prove the elaborately branching foliage is long multi-leafleted leaves are tiny, sometimes difficult to find amongst woolly hairs in the leaf axils.

The seeds are beautiful and were used for games and as jewelry by Native Americans; I roll the seeds in my hands like Captain Queeg in The Caine Mutiny. The seeds are shiny bright green early, but deepen to a hard texture and turn coffee-brown as they age.

Kentucky coffeetree bark is ridged, its wood is used in cabinetry, and its fall color is yellow. Plant one or a group as specimens for the winterscape. I noticed the greenish-white flowers for the first time this spring, and I suspect that they were from a female tree. Will pay more attention next May.

Though Kentucky coffeetree is native to the Midwest and southern U.S., it is being used farther west. My daughter, her husband, and new granddaughter (oh, how much fun being a grandparent is) just picked a street tree for their yard in Denver, and it was a Kentucky coffeetree. Great choice, growing healthily in the park by their house.

Corneliancherry dogwood (Cornus mas). This is a great small dogwood tree, often planted en masse, and very attractive in spring with its tiny chartreuse-yellow flowers. Its fruits are wonderfully tart (once they turn purple-red in fall), but also are attractive this time of year. It is rarely used as a small street tree, but is very effective in Wooster.

Sourgum (Nyssa sylvatica). This native tree, also known as black gum and tupelo, renowned as a honey tree, is becoming more popular as a landscape tree, now in weeping and upright forms. It is also quite common in woodlands, though often unnoticed. Notice it now along woodland trails as it reveals itself from above, losing a few bright red leaves as a presage to fall.

Lacebark elm (Ulmus parvifolia). This Asian elm is being used more as a street tree and it is far tougher than I imagined. I noticed it doing well in the dry environment of Amarillo, Texas, last week when on vacation. It is resistant to Dutch elm disease and its bark, ah, its bark: patterns of rust-red on a light background.

Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa). What can I say; if you go out to Colorado and New Mexico, these trees are something we wish were successful in Ohio. The smell of dry needles and bark is very evocative of the West, and the patterns of reds and blacks on the trunks are intense.

Dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium). This is not a tree, but since I am pathological about trees — literally a plant pathologist who studies tree diseases — I cannot resist a mention. Out west along the Pecos River in northern New Mexico, there it was, the dwarf mistletoe, making its living parasitizing another plant, a juniper. This yellow-orange parasitic plant, sending its suckers down into the blue-green juniper, sucking out its carbohydrates, almost looks like the juniper itself. Wow.

• Recently I wrote about the oaks and the maples, with a nod to The Trees by Rush. While in Colorado we enjoyed the Rocky Mountain maples (Acer glabrum) in Rocky Mountain National Park, the Hot Wings Tatarian maple on Denver streets, the scrub oaks with their tiny acorns along the Pecos River, the blackjack oaks of Nebraska.

To learn more about the battle of the oaks vs. the maples, their identification, landscape uses, diseases and pests, uses for various liquid refreshment: come one, come all to two upcoming programs:

• Bent Science, 7 to 8:30 p.m. Aug 16 at Bent Ladder Cidery and Winery, Rittman Orchards, Rittman. No cost, except for the cider and food you purchase. Check out bentladder.com.

• Secrest Arboretum Landscape Arts and Science (SALSA) School, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug 22 at OSU Secrest Arboretum, Wooster. $40. Google the agenda at: https://agnr.osu.edu/chatfield.

Sugar maples, bur oaks, the maple-leaved oak, oh my!

Jim Chatfield is a horticultural educator with Ohio State University Extension. If you have questions about caring for your garden, write to [email protected] or call 330-466-0270. Please include your phone number if you write.

• Medina County Herb Society Herb Garden Party, 1-4 p.m. Sunday, Greenleaf Park, 1674 S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn the many uses of herbs in the garden. http://www.facebook.com/medinaherbsociety.

• Greater Akron Orchid Society, 6:30 p.m. Aug. 13 at Portage Lakes Kiwanis, 725 Portage Lakes Drive, Coventry Township. Edgar Stehli will lead an orchid mini-class from 6:45-7 p.m. Jim France of Oakwood Orchids of Dayton will present Lycastes, Sudamerlycastes, and Idas, Oh My! For more information, call Dave at 330-307-7189 or go to http://www.thegaos.com.

Send information on home and garden events to [email protected].

Hard to believe that the dog days of August will soon be upon us, and with their arrival we usher in National Community Gardening Awareness Month!

I recently learned of this designation through the American Community Gardening Association (ACGA). According to their website, the ACGA is a nonprofit whose membership is made up of professionals, volunteers and supporters whose mission is to “build community by increasing and enhancing community gardening and greening across the United States and Canada.”

Organizations such as ACGA provide a centralized leadership framework that facilitates growth and development of state and regional networks, support resources, research and educational programming centered on community gardening.

They are a very important part of our Northeast Ohio community fabric. We find community gardens of all types with varied purposes scattered across our urban, suburban and rural landscapes. They improve quality of life by contributing to neighborhood pride and beautification, resource conservation, community asset development, socialization, food self-reliance, home food production, therapy, education, recreation and physical activity.

National Community Gardening Awareness Month was established in September 2017 with legislation introduced by Rep. Doris Matsui, D-Calif., and Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill. The month is intended to tout the benefits that community gardens across the country offer to individuals, families and those in need. It seeks to support four goals and ideals:

• Raise awareness about the significance of community gardening and urban agriculture.

• Improve access to public land for sustainable food projects.

• Encourage growth of community gardening and other food and agriculture opportunities that provide for food self-reliance, increase physical activity, build sustainable environments and enhance community.

• Support collaborative efforts at all levels between government and non-government organizations that promote the development of community gardening, and increase accessibility to disadvantaged populations.

How wonderful that a national resolution exists to draw attention to community gardening that recognizes its benefits, finds support, opens up funding opportunities, and truly aims to celebrate its individual, communal, regional and national impacts.

There are lots of ways to discover how you can help build awareness of community gardens this August and year round.

Share your quotes, photos, videos, success stories and articles about what community gardening means to you on the ACGA’s Facebook page, or email to [email protected].

Attend a local program, open house or tour and learn more about community gardening in your neighborhood.

Check out and share a resource from the ACGA at http://www.communitygarden.org/resources.

Become a volunteer at a local site and participate in a community garden volunteer or Master Gardener volunteer training program.

Attend the ACGA 39th annual conference, Sept. 13-16 in Atlanta: https://communitygarden.org/conference/.

Heather Neikirk is a Stark County Extension Educator in agriculture and natural resources for the Ohio State University Extension. If you have questions about healthy food systems, farm to school, food production, small farms, women in agriculture or food gardening, contact her at 330-832-9856 or [email protected].

• Ohio State University Extension Master Gardeners Coffee Chat, 10-11:30 a.m. Aug. 3, OSU Extension Office, Medina, 120 W. Washington St., Medina. Becky Szymanski and Marcie Zemancik present “The Tired Garden: Keep Your Garden Vibrant All Year Round.” $5. http://www.go.osu.edu/chats.

• Permaculture and Sustainable Gardening, 9 a.m. to noon Aug. 4 at Soil and Water Conservation District, 6970 State Route 88, Ravenna. Portage County OSU Extension Master Gardener Volunteers, Mary Lou Holly and Pamm McDowell will discuss the principles of permaculture design and creating a more holistic garden. Free. To register, call 330-296-6432 or email [email protected].

• Medina County Herb Society Herb Garden Party, 1-4 p.m. Aug. 5, Greenleaf Park, 1674 S. Medina Line Road, Sharon Center. Learn the many uses of herbs in the garden. http://www.facebook.com/medinaherbsociety.

Send information on home and garden events to [email protected].

The dog days of summer are here with a vengeance. Vegetable gardens are beginning to produce abundantly, weeds are growing with vigor and extremely hot weather can cause the most dedicated gardeners to grow weary.

With all of the garden action, I have received a number of calls regarding a variety of “problems.” This week I will focus on some of the questions that have come into the office.

Q: I applied a “weed and feed” type product to my lawn two weeks ago and the entire lawn died. What happened?

Weed and feed lawn care products are a mixture of fertilizer and pre-emergent herbicide, which prevents the seeds of some weed species from germinating, or post-emergent broadleaf herbicides, depending on the formulation.

After further discussion with the client, she indicated that actually most of her lawn was clover and other types of broadleaved weed plants, rather than turf grass. So the product did exactly what it was supposed to do, which is kill broadleaved plants!

It is important to note that it is not recommended to use weed and feed products when the temperatures are above 90 degrees. The hot weather we have recently experienced may have contributed to the issue.

What should be done now? This isn’t the ideal time to either reseed or fertilize lawns. In this case, because most of the homeowner’s lawn was unwanted weed plants, it might be in the homeowner’s best interests to remove what is left, rake the debris and reseed beginning in mid-August with an appropriate grass variety for the site.

The client was also advised to do a soil test as soon as possible to see if the pH needs to be adjusted via the application of lime or sulfur, and to determine whether there is a nutrient deficiency and the level of organic matter before re-seeding.

There are many other things such as chinch bugs and fungal diseases that are currently causing dead patches in lawns so it is important to find the root cause of an issue to make the best decisions regarding management.

Read more about lawn problems at https://plantscience.psu.edu/research/centers/turf/extension/home-lawns.

Q: Japanese beetles are devouring my blueberries. We have put up traps and applied insecticides over and over but it doesn’t work. What can I do?

This beautiful but very destructive insect will feed on more than 400 species of plants, eating leaves and roots (depending the insect’s stage of development). There are many Japanese beetle “hot spots” throughout the region this year where they are attacking landscape, vegetable and fruit crops.

Several management strategies are available but it is important to know a little more about the way that each strategy works. Japanese beetle traps are very effective in attracting beetles. If the traps are placed near a plant that they like, chances are as they are being lured into the area, they will stop and spend some time feasting on your plants before heading to the trap. Not the most effective strategy.

If you are going to use an insecticide, it is important to be sure that the product has both the target insect and the affected plant listed on the label. Also pay attention to pollinator warnings now listed on some pesticide labels which will provide guidance on appropriate times to use. Many widely used pesticides that effectively control Japanese beetles can also affect pollinators.

Adhere to the post-harvest interval, which indicates how long you have to wait to consume fruit or vegetables after application, and the personal protective equipment listed on the label. The label is the law.

Many products are effective but the vast majority are contact insecticides and do not have any residual action, so while the product may take care of beetles currently there, it won’t affect newcomers. While effective in other regions of the United States, “milky spore disease” products do not provide control in Ohio.

An old-fashioned but somewhat effective method is the bucket of soapy water. Keep one of these nearby, knock the insects into the bucket and dispose away from the garden.

Read more about Japanese beetles at https://extension.entm.purdue.edu/publications/E-75/E-75.html.

Q: My dogwood tree looks terrible with spots all over the leaves and the twigs seem to be dying. What is going on, and can I save this tree?

One of the greatest challenges when trying to diagnose plant problems is describing the problem. Spots, splotches, streaks and colors are described differently by different persons. This best advice is to bring a sample into the Extension office. Some diseases cannot be diagnosed at the office and will need to be sent to the C. Wayne Ellet diagnostic lab.

In this case, the issue could be dogwood anthracnose. The symptoms usually start as leaf spots with tan or purple edges and begin to affect dogwoods in late May. The spots expand, then the twigs and then branches may become infected. Often the infected leaves will not fall off of the plant and the spore can spread to neighboring branches and dogwood trees. If the disease reaches the trunk it can kill the entire tree.

To tell the difference between this disease and others of dogwood, look under the leaves. With anthracnose, small pinpoint spots can be found within the diseased tissue.

Prune out all of the dead wood and any suckers that are growing on the trunk when the weather is dry. Rake and remove as many of the fallen leaves as possible and dispose of them. Do not over-apply nitrogen because this may spur succulent growth that is more susceptible to the fungus.

It is also important not to dig up dogwoods from the woods and transplant them into residential landscapes. There are several anthracnose-resistant varieties available. In severe cases, fungicide application in the late fall and early spring during leaf expansion can help manage the issue.

For more information on dogwood anthracnose, see https://extension.umd.edu/hgic/dogwood-anthracnose-discula-trees

Master Gardeners

Become an Extension Master Gardener Volunteer. The Summit County Extension office is now accepting applications for the Fall 2018 Basic Training Class. For information, visit http://www.summitmastergardeners.org/become-a-master-gardener/.

Jacqueline Kowalski is the Summit County Agriculture and Natural Resources Extension educator for the Ohio State University. For questions on local foods, food production or other garden-related questions, contact her at [email protected] or 330-928-4769 ext. 2456. Call the Extension Master Gardener Volunteer Hotline from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesdays at 330-928-4769, option 3 or extension 2481 or 2482.

The great attraction in growing perennial flowers is that you never have to replant them, at least in theory. This doesn’t make all perennials care-free. Few of them let you just sit back to enjoy them year after year.

Take coreopsis, a wonderful perennial that ends its first flush of bright yellow blossoms around midsummer. Like a number of other perennial flowers, coreopsis can be overly exuberant in some gardens — mine, for instance. Right now, the plants are threatening to take over the whole flower bed.

Coreopsis spreads very effectively by self-sown seeds and by roots that travel underground and then send up shoots (“suckers”). Both seedlings and root suckers are beginning to elbow out dianthus and other more sedate neighbors.

Agastache (sometimes known as anise hyssop) is one plant that can stand up to coreopsis. Agastache is so aggressive that I might call it a weed, tempting me to remove it altogether. Like coreopsis, it spreads by seeds and suckering roots. As I pull on those licorice-minty stems, though, their aroma beckons me to leave in at least a few plants.

Fortunately, keeping agastache, coreopsis, and similarly exuberant perennials in line is easy. A quick tug on a stem or two will wrench a wayward plant from the ground, roots and all, causing little disturbance to nearby plants. (Tug on too many stems at once and they don’t release so easily, or they pull along a clump of soil.)

If I did want to plant more of any of these perennials, those dislodged stems re-establish quickly at a new site or in pots to plant out later.

Oriental poppy is another perennial needing some attention in summer. Excess plants may need to be weeded out, but — more important — it needs tidying up. Oriental poppy dies back in summer, so I cut back the sad-looking, dying stalks and leaves and cart them to the compost pile.

I mentioned that dianthus is well-behaved, yet even this plant needs some attention. Shearing back the stems now that the first flush of bloom is past helps coax another flush this season or, at least, better bloom next year.

Shearing stimulates growth of new, flower-bearing stems and diverts energy that otherwise would go into ripening seeds to new growth and blossoms. Thwarting seed production also prevents at least one means of spread of some perennials.

Other plants slated for shearing or cutting back include snow-in-summer, delphinium and columbine.

A few perennials do live up to gardeners’ hopes of a plant you set in the ground and then do nothing more. Some that come to mind are peony, daylily, hellebore and hosta, all with enough foliage to even shade out most weeds. Baby’s-breath and butterfly weed also rarely need attention but don’t have dense foliage, so keep them weeded.

• Parade of Ponds: South of Route 224 Tour, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Self-guided tour of ponds. Booklets are $10 at http://waterxscapes.com/parade-of-ponds/.

• Bee Festival, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway St., Medina. Medina County Beekeepers Association: opening of the hive, beekeeping show and tell, honey tasting, Nate the Great’s balloon art. http://www.mcdl.info/BeeFest.

• Manure Science Review, 8:45 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday at Watkins Farms, 18361 Township Road 90, Forest. Learn about weed seeds in manure, avoiding spills, reducing runoff, rules and liability, and more. https://bit.ly/2O0JMoA.

• Summit County Master Gardeners: Meet Me In The Garden Series, 7 p.m. Wednesday, F.A. Seiberling Nature Realm, 1828 Smith Road, Akron. “The Basics of Backyard Composting” presented by Dave Daly. Free. http://www.summitmastergardeners.org.

• Ohio State University Extension Master Gardeners Coffee Chats, 10-11:30 a.m. Aug. 3, OSU Extension Office, Medina, 120 W. Washington St., Medina. Becky Szymanski and Marcie Zemancik present The Tired Garden: Keep Your Garden Vibrant All Year Round. $5. http://www.go.osu.edu/chats.

Send information on home and garden events to [email protected].

• Canton Garden Center’s Secret Garden Tour, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Tickets $20 at Canton Garden Center, 1615 Stadium Park Drive NW. Hobby farm with goats, chickens, a miniature horse and micro pig; a garden designed for pollinators, birds and beneficial insects and is designated as a monarch waystation. 330-455-6172 or http://www.cantongardencenter.com.

• Parade of Ponds: North of Route 224 Tour, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Self-guided tour of ponds. Booklets are $10 at http://waterxscapes.com/parade-of-ponds/.

• Twinsburg Garden Club: Double Event Day, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at Twinsburg Historical Society Freeman Barn, 8996 Darrow Road, Twinsburg. National Garden Club Horticulture Specialty Flower Show in conjunction with the Twinsburg Garden Tour. Flower show is free and open to public. Garden tour $8 in advance and $10 at the door; http://www.twinsburg-garden-club.com.

• Gardeners of Greater Akron, 5:30 p.m. Monday, St. George Fellowship Centre, 3204 Ridgewood Road, Copley. Dinner at 6:30 p.m. $13 at the door (members and guests). How to Prepare Horticultural Show Pieces. http://gogakron.org/programs.htm.

• Northeast Ohio Grape & Wine Field Day, 1-4:30 p.m. Thursday at the Ashtabula Agricultural Research Station, 2625 S. Ridge Road E., Kingsville. Learn about vineyard sustainability. Call Andy Kirk at 440-224-0273 or email [email protected].

• Pickling Vegetables and Pressure Cooker Demonstration, 6-9 p.m. Thursday at Portage County Randolph Fair Grounds 4215 Fairground Road, Atwater. Participants may have their canners tested before the programs for $5 each. For registration, go to https://bit.ly/2L9r5gz.

• Portage County Beekeepers, 7-9 p.m. Thursday at Maplewood Career Center, 7075 State Route 88, Ravenna. Frank Licata, general manager of Mann Lake, will speak about honeybee nutrition. Free. Call Mary Lovin at 330-325-3028.

• Parade of Ponds: South of Route 224 Tour, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 21 and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 22. Self-guided tour of ponds. Booklets are $10 at http://waterxscapes.com/parade-of-ponds/.

• Bee Festival, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 21 at Medina Library, 210 S. Broadway St., Medina. Medina County Beekeepers Association: opening of the hive, beekeeping show and tell, honey tasting, Nate the Great’s balloon art. http://www.mcdl.info/BeeFest.

Send information on home and garden events to [email protected].

• Making Sense of Native and Invasive Plants, 5:30-7 p.m. Wednesday, OSU Extension’s Ravenna office, 705 Oakwood St., Suite 101, Ravenna. Manage your land for wildlife and protect your timber. To register, call 330-296-6432 or email [email protected].

• Canton Garden Center’s Secret Garden Tour, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. July 13-15. Tickets $20 at Canton Garden Center, 1615 Stadium Park Drive NW. Hobby farm with goats, chickens, a miniature horse and micro pig; a garden designed for pollinators, birds and beneficial insects and is designated as a Monarch Waystation. 330-455-6172 or http://www.cantongardencenter.com.

• Parade of Ponds: Under the Lights Tour, 8:30-10:30 p.m. Friday. Self-guided evening tour of ponds. Booklets are $10 at http://waterxscapes.com/parade-of-ponds/.

• Parade of Ponds: North of Route 224 Tour, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 14 and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 15. Self-guided tour of ponds. Booklets are $10 at http://waterxscapes.com/parade-of-ponds/.

• Twinsburg Garden Club: Double Event Day, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 14 at Twinsburg Historical Society Freeman Barn, 8996 Darrow Road, Twinsburg. National Garden Club Horticulture Specialty Flower Show in conjunction with the Twinsburg Garden Tour. Flower show is free and open to public. Garden Tour $8 in advance and $10 at the door; http://www.twinsburg-garden-club.com.

• Portage County Beekeepers, 7-9 p.m. July 19 at Maplewood Career Center, 7075 State Route 88, Ravenna. Frank Licata, general manager of Mann Lake, will speak about honeybee nutrition. Free. Call Mary Lovin at 330-325-3028.

• Parade of Ponds: South of Route 224 Tour, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 21 and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 22. Self-guided tour of ponds. Booklets are $10 at http://waterxscapes.com/parade-of-ponds/.

Send information on home and garden events to [email protected].

The Midwest Landscape Preservation Symposium will be July 10-11 at the Akron Art Museum. It’s presented by the Consortium of Akron/Summit County Historic Properties and is designed to appeal to people with an interest in sustainably preserving properties or neighborhoods.

Sessions include lectures, discussions and tours. Each day costs $50 and sessions run from 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. July 10 and 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. July 11.

Keynote speaker Robin Karson will discuss landscape architect Warren Manning, who was hired by F.A. Seiberling as an environmental planner for Goodyear Heights and for executive homes in Fairlawn Heights.

For a registration form, email Kathie VanDevere at [email protected]; pick up in person at Dayton’s, Graf’s or Suncrest garden centers; or call Hale Farm and Village at 330-666-3711, ext. 1708, or 1720.

Events

• Ohio State University Extension Master Gardeners Coffee Chats, 10-11:30 a.m. Friday at OSU Extension Office, Medina, 120 W. Washington St., Medina. Barb Brodie presents Tips for Physically Challenged Gardeners. $5. http://www.go.osu.edu/chats.

• Ohio State University Extension Pond School, 5:30-8:30 p.m. July 10, Medina County Park District’s Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Sharon Township. Learn more about pond management. $30 per family and includes resources. Registration deadline is July 6. http://go.osu.edu/pond.

• Parade of Ponds: Under the Lights Tour, 8:30-10:30 p.m. July 13. Self-guided evening tour of ponds. Booklets are $10 at http://waterxscapes.com/parade-of-ponds/.

• Parade of Ponds: North of Route 224 Tour, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 14 and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 15. Self-guided tour of ponds. Booklets are $10 at http://waterxscapes.com/parade-of-ponds/.

Send information on home and garden events to [email protected].

• Summit County Master Gardeners’ Annual Tour of Gardens, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Six gardens on main tour. http://www.summitmastergardeners.org.

• Emerald Necklace Garden Club “Garden Party” Flower Shows, 12:30-4 p.m. Saturday and noon to 3 p.m. Sunday at Brecksville Community Center, 1 Community Drive, Brecksville. Creative floral designs, container-garden plants, cut specimens, educational exhibits. Free. http://www.emeraldnecklace gardenclub.com.

• Naturalist Series: Gardening for Pollinators, 6-7:30 p.m. Tuesday at Fellows Riverside Gardens, 123 McKinley Ave., Youngstown. Denise Ellsworth, OSU Department of Entomology, will explore the options of gardening for pollinators. Free. 330-533-5538.

• Summit County Master Gardeners Meet Me in the Garden 2018, 7 p.m. Wednesday at F.A. Seiberling Nature Realm, Visitors Center, 1828 Smith Road, Akron. Carol A. Knock, master gardener and retired educator, presents The Wonderful World of Succulents. http://www.summitmastergardeners.org

• Ohio State University Extension Master Gardeners Coffee Chats, 10-11:30 a.m. July 6, OSU Extension Office, Medina, 120 W. Washington St., Medina. Barb Brodie presents Tips for Physically Challenged Gardeners. $5. http://www.go.osu.edu/chats.

• A Midwestern Landscape Preservation Symposium, 8:30 a.m. July 10 beginning at the Akron Art Museum, 1 S. High St., Akron; 9 a.m. July 11 beginning at the Akron Zoo, 505 Euclid Ave., Akron. $50 per day. For information and to register, call 330-666-3711, ext. 1708.

• Ohio State University Extension Pond School, 5:30-8:30 p.m. July 10, Medina County Park District’s Wolf Creek Environmental Center, 6100 Ridge Road, Medina. Learn about pond management. $30 per family, includes take home resources. Registration deadline is July 6. http://go.osu.edu/pond.

Send information on home and garden events to [email protected].

• Akron Garden Club’s Art Blooms Flower Show, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, at Akron Art Museum, 1 S. High St., Akron. 20 floral designs inspired by works at the museum, arranged throughout the galleries. $10 for adults, $8 seniors and students. http://www.akrongardenclub.org.

• Chippewa Garden Club Kids Garden Project, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Saturday at Brecksville Library, 9089 Brecksville Road. Children will decorate a pot containing a plant for Dad. http://www.chippewagardenclub.com.

• Freedom Gardens Open Garden Day, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday and June 24 at Freedom Gardens, 6193 Vair Road, Freedom Township. Enjoy the collection of over 1,200 different roses at peak bloom. For more information, call Susan or Peter at 330-296-2618 or go to http://www.freedomgardens.com.

• Herbs for Pollinator Conservation, 9:30 a.m. to noon Monday at OSU Mahoning County Extension Office, 490 S. Broad St., Canfield. Presented by Marilyn McKinley, Master Gardener volunteer. $15. For registration, call 330-533-5538.

• Gardeners of Greater Akron Annual Strawberry Festival, 5:30 p.m. Monday, Goodyear Metro Park’s East Pavilion. The club will provide chicken, drinks and strawberry shortcake. Members and guests bring your own table service, vegetable, salad and any other desired food items. http://gogakron.org/programs.htm

• Preserving the Harvest Workshop: Making Jam and Jelly, 6-8 p.m. Thursday at Portage County Randolph Fair Grounds, 4215 Fairground Road, Randolph. Geared to teach newcomers the basics and provide a refresher course to experienced home canners. Cost is $10. To register, https://portage.osu.edu or call 330-296-6432.

• Twinsburg Garden Club, 6:30 p.m. Thursday at Christ the King Lutheran Church, 10285 Ravenna Road, Twinsburg. Pam Wetterau will give a presentation on succulents. http://www.twinsburg-garden-club.com.

• Summit County Master Gardeners’ Annual Tour of Gardens, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 23. Six gardens on main tour, seventh Secret Garden for Friday patron party. Tickets for both at http://www.summitmastergardeners.org.

• Emerald Necklace Garden Club “Garden Party” Flower Shows, 12:30-4 p.m. June 23 and noon to 3 p.m. June 24 at Brecksville Community Center, 1 Community Drive, Brecksville. Creative floral designs, container-garden plants, cut specimens, educational exhibits. Free. http://www.emeraldnecklace gardenclub.com.

• Naturalist Series: Gardening for Pollinators, 6-7:30 p.m. June 26 at Fellows Riverside Gardens, 123 McKinley Ave., Youngstown. Denise Ellsworth, OSU Department of Entomology, will explore the options of gardening for pollinators. Free. For information, call 330-533-5538.

Send information on home and garden events to [email protected].

• Schnormeier Gardens and Gallery Open House, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Schnormeier Gardens, 8701 Laymon Road, Gambier. Schnormeier Gardens has an Asian flavor featuring a variety of plantings accented by boulders, stone walls, waterfalls, sculptures and structures. https://bit.ly/2IFkKMC.

• Friends of Yellow Creek Native Plant Sale, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Bath Heritage Corridor Exhibit at 950 N. Cleveland-Massillon Road. Plants from Native Roots Inc., a local grower, will be available as plugs and in pots. http://www.yellowcreekwatershed.org, 330-329-5299.

• Hale Farm & Village’s Sow & Grow Festival & Plant Sale, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Hale Farm & Village, 2686 Oak Hill Road, Bath. Draft horse demonstrations, beekeeping and chicken keeping talks, sheep shearing, natural dyeing and more. $10 adults, $5 ages 3-12. http://www.halefarm.org.

• Freedom Gardens Open Garden Days, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, June 17 and 24 at 6193 Vair Road, Freedom Township. Enjoy the collection of more than 1,200 different roses at peak bloom. Call Susan or Peter at 330-296-2618 or go to http://www.freedomgardens.com.

Greater Akron Orchid Society, 6:15 p.m. Monday at the Portage Lakes Kiwanis, 725 Portage Lakes Drive, Coventry Township. Silent orchid auction, potluck dinner and re-potting demonstration. Bring an entree, side or dessert to share. Call Dave at 330-307-7189 or go to http://www.thegaos.com.

• Small Grains Field Day, 9:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. Tuesday at OARDC Schaffter Farm, 3240 Oil City Road, Wooster. Walk through research plot, hands-on activities and equipment demonstrations. $35. To register, go to https://go.osu.edu/2018SmallGrains.

• Margot Kahn, co-editor of This Is the Place: Women Writing About Home, 7 p.m. Thursday at the Hudson Library & Historical Society, 96 Library St., Hudson. Kahn will discuss her anthology. Free. To register, call 330-653-6658, ext. 1010, or go to http://www.hudsonlibrary.org.

• Akron Garden Club’s Art Blooms Flower Show, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday-Sunday, June 15-17, at the Akron Art Museum, 1 S. High St., Akron. 20 floral designs inspired by works at the museum, arranged throughout the galleries. $10 for adults, $8 seniors and students. http://www.akrongardenclub.org.

• Chippewa Garden Club Kids Garden Project, 9:30-11:30 a.m. June 16 at the Brecksville Library, 9089 Brecksville Road. Children will decorate a pot containing a plant for Dad. http://www.chippewagardenclub.com.

• Herbs for Pollinator Conservation, 9:30 a.m. to noon June 18 at OSU Mahoning County Extension Office, 490 S. Broad St., Canfield. Presented by Marilyn McKinley, Master Gardener Volunteer. $15. For registration, call 330-533-5538.

• Preserving the Harvest Workshop: Making Jam and Jelly, 6-8 p.m. June 21 at Portage County Randolph Fair Grounds, 4215 Fairground Road, Randolph. Geared to teach newcomers the basics and provide a refresher course to experienced home canners. Cost is $10. To register, https://portage.osu.edu or call 330-296-6432.

• Twinsburg Garden Club, 6:30 p.m. June 21 at Christ the King Lutheran Church, 10285 Ravenna Road, Twinsburg. Pam Wetterau will give a presentation on succulents. http://www.twinsburg-garden-club.com.

Send information on home and garden events to [email protected].

• Ohio State University Extension: Planting, Raising & Using Cut Flowers, 9 a.m. to noon Saturday, OSU Extension Office, Geauga, 14269 Claridon-Troy Road, Burton. Join Master Gardener Volunteer Chris Pappas to learn how to design a cutting garden. $40. http://www.go.osu.edu/chats.

• Schnormeier Gardens and Gallery Open House, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday- Sunday, June 7-10, Schnormeier Gardens, 8701 Laymon Road, Gambier. Schnormeier Gardens has an Asian flavor featuring a variety of plantings accented by boulders, stone walls, waterfalls, sculptures and structures. https://bit.ly/2IFkKMC.

• Friends of Yellow Creek Native Plant Sale, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. June 9, Bath Heritage Corridor Exhibit at 950 N. Cleveland-Massillon Road. Plants from Native Roots Inc., a local grower, will be available as plugs and in pots. http://www.yellowcreekwatershed.org, 330-329-5299.

• Hale Farm & Village’s Sow & Grow Festival & Plant Sale, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 9-10, Hale Farm & Village, 2686 Oak Hill Road, Bath. Festival includes draft horse demonstrations, beekeeping and chicken keeping talks, sheep shearing, natural dyeing and more. $10 adults, $5 ages 3-12. http://www.halefarm.org.

• Freedom Gardens Open Garden Days, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 10, 17 and 24 at 6193 Vair Road, Freedom Township. Enjoy the collection of more than 1,200 different roses at peak bloom. Call Susan or Peter at 330-296-2618 or go to http://www.freedomgardens.com.

Greater Akron Orchid Society, 6:15 p.m. June 11 at the Portage Lakes Kiwanis, 725 Portage Lakes Drive, Coventry Township. Silent orchid auction, potluck dinner and re-potting demonstration. Bring an entree, side or dessert to share. Call Dave at 330-307-7189 or go to http://www.thegaos.com.

• Small Grains Field Day, 9:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. June 12 at OARDC Schaffter Farm, 3240 Oil City Road, Wooster. Participants have an opportunity to walk through research plot, take part in hands-on activities and view equipment demonstrations. $35. To register, go to https://go.osu.edu/2018SmallGrains.

• Margot Kahn, co-editor of This Is the Place: Women Writing About Home, 7 p.m. June 14 at the Hudson Library & Historical Society, 96 Library St., Hudson. Margot Kahn will discuss her anthology. Free. To register, call 330-653-6658, ext. 1010, or go to http://www.hudsonlibrary.org.

• Akron Garden Club’s Art Blooms Flower Show, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. June 15-17 at the Akron Art Museum, 1 S. High St., Akron. 20 floral designs inspired by works on exhibition at the museum, arrayed throughout the galleries. $10 for adults, $8 seniors and students. http://www.akrongardenclub.org.

Send information on home and garden events to [email protected].

• Ohio State University Extension Master Gardeners Coffee Chats, 10-11:30 a.m. June 1, OSU Extension Office, Medina, 120 W. Washington St., Medina. Deb Collins presents Hosta School. $5. http://www.go.osu.edu/chats.

• Ohio State University Extension “Planting, Raising & Using Cut Flowers,” 9 a.m. to noon June 2, OSU Extension Office, Geauga, 14269 Claridon-Troy Road, Burton. Join Master Gardener Volunteer Chris Pappas to learn how to design a cutting garden. $40. http://www.go.osu.edu/chats.

• Schnormeier Gardens and Gallery Open House, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. June 7-10, Schnormeier Gardens, 8701 Laymon Road, Gambier. Schnormeier Gardens has an Asian flavor featuring a variety of plantings accented by boulders, stone walls, waterfalls, sculptures and structures. https://bit.ly/2IFkKMC .

Send information on home and garden events to [email protected].

The 41st annual Bath Volunteers for Service Home Tour includes this custom 2013 home in Firestone Trace with touches inspired by Stan Hywet Hall, where one of the owners is a longtime volunteer. These include extra-wide door jambs, a butler’s pantry and even a reproduction of a Gertrude Seiberling painting.

Other distinctive features are the massive cast stone mantel and fireplace in the great room, custom moldings in the study, a deck and bluestone patio, hickory floors and lots of windows to take advantage of the view and natural light.

The Bath Volunteers for Service Home Tour, featuring five homes and a garden, runs from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Thursday. Tickets can be picked up at the Bath United Church of Christ, 3980 W. Bath Road, Bath. The $35 ticket includes the luncheon and style show; tour only is $25. http://bathvolunteersforservice.com/home-tour.

Events

• Wolcott Lilac Gardens Open Weekend, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, 450 W. Main St., Kent. Park at Christ Episcopal Church, 118 S. Mantua St., Kent. $3 donation requested. http://www.facebook.com/LilacGardens/.

• Ohio State Master Gardener Volunteers of Stark County Plant Expo, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Stark County Fairgrounds, Fair Board building, 305 Wertz Ave. NW, Canton. Perennials, native plants, heirlooms, vegetables and herbs for sale. http://osustarkmg.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/2018-MGV-Plant-Expo-Flyer.pdf.

• Stan Hywet Plant Sale, begins at 10 a.m. Saturday, Courtyard near Molly’s Shop, 714 N. Portage Path, Akron. Plants including Stan Hywet’s “Homegrown Series” of containers and baskets available for purchase through June 3. Molly’s Shop hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday. http://www.stanhywet.org.

Portage County Beekeepers, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, at the Portage County Soil and Water Building, 6970 State Route 88, Ravenna. Field Day with hive inspection, potluck lunch and presentation. Free. Call Mary Lovin at 330-325-3028.

• Ohio State Master Gardeners: Prairie Gardens, 9:30 a.m. to noon Monday, Mahoning County Extension Office, 490 S. Broad St., Canfield. How to choose and prepare a site, plant selection and maintenance with speakers Peg Zeleznik and Kary Shively. To register, go to https://mahoning.osu.edu/events/coffee-master-gardeners-10.

• Gardeners of Greater Akron, 5:30 p.m. Monday, St. George Fellowship Centre, 3204 Ridgewood Road, Copley. Fish fry dinner at 6:30 p.m., plant auction. $13 at the door (members and guests). http://gogakron.org/programs.htm

• Ohio Woodland Steward Program: Trees On Tap, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, Eisenhower Memorial Hall, 1760 University Drive, Mansfield. Topics related to trees and the challenges they face. $40. To register, go to https://woodlandstewards.osu.edu/events/trees-tap.

• Summit County Master Gardeners, 7 p.m. Wednesday, F.A. Seiberling Nature Realm, 1828 Smith Road, Akron. Meet Me in the Garden: Weeds. Learn to identify common weeds in Ohio, their history, folklore, and management. Free. http://www.summitmastergardeners.org.

• Ohio State University Extension Master Gardeners Coffee Chats, 10-11:30 a.m. June 1, OSU Extension Office, Medina, 120 W. Washington St., Medina. Deb Collins presents Hosta School. $5. For information, go to http://www.go.osu.edu/chats.

Send information on home and garden events to [email protected].

• Wolcott Lilac Gardens Mother’s Day Weekend, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, 450 W. Main St., Kent. Park at Christ Episcopal Church, 118 S. Mantua St., Kent. $3 donation requested. http://www.facebook.com/LilacGardens/.

Crown Point Ecology Center Organic Plant Sale, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, 3 to 7 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. May 19, 3220 Ira Road, Bath. More than 200 varieties of vegetables, flowers and herbs, heirloom plants. http://www.crownpointecology.org

Copley-Fairlawn Kiwanis Flower Sale, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, intersection of Copley and Jacoby roads, Copley. Flats, pots, hanging baskets. copley-fairlawnkiwanis.org.

• Portage Lakes Career Center Spring Greenhouse Sale, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday and Monday-Friday, Portage Lakes Career Center, 4401 Shriver Road, Green. For plants and prices, call Bridget Comes at 330-896-8289, email [email protected] or go to http://www.plcc.edu/community/plcc-greenhouse.

• Trash & Treasure Plant Sale, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday at Soil and Water Conservation District, 6970 State Route 88, Ravenna. Perennials, annuals, hanging baskets, vegetables, culinary herbs, native plants. For information, call Robin Christensen at 330-296-6432 or email [email protected].

Greater Akron Orchid Society, 6:30 p.m. Monday at the Portage Lakes Kiwanis, 725 Portage Lakes Drive, Coventry Township. Edgar Stehli will teach a mini-class from 6:45-7 p.m., “Enjoying Encyclia and Epidendrum Orchids.” For information, call Dave at 330-307-7189 or go to http://www.thegaos.com.

• Ohio Woodland Steward Program presents Woodland Pollinators, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, OSU Mansfield, 100 Ovalwood Hall, 1760 University Drive, Mansfield. Hunt around the OSU Mansfield campus for woodland pollinators and habitat features. Indoor sessions on bees, butterflies, moths, hummingbirds, forest management. $35. To register, go to https://woodlandstewards.osu.edu/events/woodland-pollinators.

• Ikebana International Chapter, 10 a.m. Friday at the Cuyahoga Falls Library, 2015 Third St. Michael Rusnak, president of Akron-Canton Bonsai Society, will demonstrate starting bonsai from potted and throwaway material. Free. 330-923-8850.

• Wolcott Lilac Gardens Open Weekend, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. May 19, 450 W. Main St., Kent. Park at Christ Episcopal Church, 118 S. Mantua St., Kent. $3 donation requested. http://www.facebook.com/LilacGardens/.

• Ohio State Master Gardener Volunteers of Stark County Plant Expo, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 19, Stark County Fairgrounds, Fair Board building, 305 Wertz Ave. NW, Canton. Perennials, native plants, heirlooms, vegetables and herbs for sale. http://osustarkmg.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/2018-MGV-Plant-Expo-Flyer.pdf.

`• Stan Hywet Plant Sale, begins at 10 a.m. May 19, Courtyard near Molly’s Shop, 714 N. Portage Path, Akron. Plants including Stan Hywet’s “Homegrown Series” of containers and baskets available for purchase through June 3. Molly’s Shop hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday-Sunday. http://www.stanhywet.org.

Portage County Beekeepers, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 20 at the Portage County Soil and Water Building, 6970 State Route 88, Ravenna. Field Day with hive inspection, potluck lunch and presentation. Free. Call Mary Lovin at 330-325-3028.

• Ohio State Master Gardeners present Prairie Gardens, 9:30 a.m. to noon May 21, Mahoning County Extension Office, 490 S. Broad St., Canfield. How to choose and prepare a site, plant selection and maintenance with speakers Peg Zeleznik and Kary Shively. To register, go to https://mahoning.osu.edu/events/coffee-master-gardeners-10.

• Ohio Woodland Steward Program presents Trees On Tap, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 23, Eisenhower Memorial Hall, 1760 University Drive, Mansfield. Topics related to trees and the challenges they face. $40. To register, go to https://woodlandstewards.osu.edu/events/trees-tap.

• Summit County Master Gardeners, 7 p.m. May 23, F.A. Seiberling Nature Realm, 1828 Smith Road, Akron. Meet Me in the Garden: Weeds. Learn to identify common weeds in Ohio, their history, folklore, and management. Free. http://www.summitmastergardeners.org.

• Bath Volunteers for Service Annual Home Tour, 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. May 24. Tickets can be picked up at the Bath United Church of Christ, 3980 W. Bath Road, Bath. Five homes and a garden featured on this year’s tour. $35 includes the luncheon and style show. Tour only $25. http://www.eventbrite.com.

Send information on home and garden events to [email protected].

• Quail Hollow Park Art, Craft, and Herb Fair, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sunday, Quail Hollow Park, 13480 Congress Lake Ave., Lake Township. Artists and crafters will set up on all three floors of the historic Stewart Manor House. Free. 330-608-1487 or http://www.quailhollowpark.net.

• Portage Lakes Career Center Spring Greenhouse Sale, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 7-12 and May 14-18, Portage Lakes Career Center, 4401 Shriver Road, Uniontown. For a list of plants and prices, call Bridget Comes at 330-896-8289, email [email protected] or go to http://www.plcc.edu/community/plcc-greenhouse.

• Emerald Necklace Garden Club, 9:15 a.m. Thursday, Christ the Redeemer Lutheran Church, 9201 Brecksville Road, Brecksville. Lee Paulson will present “How to Grow Terrific Tomatoes.” For information, call Lisa at 440-838-0558 or email [email protected].

• Ohio State University Extension Culinary Herbs for Northeast Ohio, 5:30-7 p.m. Thursday, OSU Extension Office, 705 Oakwood St., Suite 101, Ravenna. Polly Tucker will discuss growing culinary herbs year-round. Free. To register, call 330-296-6432 or email [email protected].

• Twinsburg Garden Club, 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Christ the King Lutheran Church, 10285 Ravenna Road, Twinsburg. Speaker Alison McKim, manager/director of Angie’s Garden at University Hospital Rainbow Babies’ and Children’s Hospital. For information, go to http://www.twinsburg-garden-club.com.

• Trash & Treasure Plant Sale, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. May 12 at Soil and Water Conservation District, 6970 State Route 88, Ravenna. Perennials, annuals, hanging baskets, vegetables, culinary herbs, and native plants will be available. For information, call Robin Christensen at 330-296-6432 or email [email protected].

Greater Akron Orchid Society, 6:30 p.m. May 14 at the Portage Lakes Kiwanis, 725 Portage Lakes Drive, Akron. Edgar Stehli will teach a mini-class from 6:45-7 p.m. Edgar Stehli will present “Enjoying Encyclia and Epidendrum Orchids.” For information, call Dave at 330-307-7189 or go to http://www.thegaos.com.

Send information on home and garden events to [email protected].