WASHINGTON

Second-rainiest storm

in study was Florence

Hurricane Florence was the nation's second-rainiest storm in 70 years, a top rainfall meteorologist calculated.

Only last year's Hurricane Harvey rained more over a 14,000-square-mile area during a four-day period, said Ken Kunkel, a meteorologist at the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration and North Carolina State University.

Scientists said climate change likely boosted rainfall totals for both storms.

Kunkel's preliminary analysis found more than 17.5 inches fell on average over five weather stations in the eastern Carolinas stretching from Fayetteville, N.C., to Florence, S.C. The amount is second to Harvey's 25.6 inches. Kunkel based his work on rainfall since 1949 when recording became more widespread.

 

CHICAGO

Chinese citizen accused

of spying, recruiting

A Chinese citizen living in Chicago was arrested Tuesday for allegedly spying, including by helping with the recruitment of U.S. engineers, defense contractors and scientists for intelligence services in China, federal prosecutors said.

Ji Chaoqun, 27, is charged with one count of knowingly acting in the U.S. as an agent of a foreign government without prior notification of the attorney general, a statement from the U.S. attorney's office in Chicago said. He allegedly worked at the direction of high-ranking intelligence officials with the People's Republic of China.

 

Study: Often, antibiotics

can replace appendectomy

When emergency tests showed the telltale right-sided pain in Heather VanDusen's abdomen was appendicitis, she figured she'd be quickly wheeled into surgery. But doctors offered her the option of antibiotics instead.

A new study from Finland shows her choice is a reasonable alternative for most patients with appendicitis. Five years after treatment with antibiotics, almost two-thirds of patients hadn't had another attack.

Advances in imaging tests, mainly CT scans, have made it easier to determine if an appendix might burst, or if patients could be safely treated without surgery.

Beacon Journal/

Ohio.com wires