DETROIT — A plane carrying 129 people skidded Saturday from a slick Chicago runway and a plow driver was killed when his truck rolled over outside Kansas City following a winter storm that covered many parts of the Midwest in snow and ice.

The nation's wild weather also came in the form of a possible tornado; the National Weather Service in Birmingham, Alabama, said radar indicated a tornado was in the area.

No injuries were reported on the United Airlines flight at O'Hare International Airport as it arrived Saturday morning from Phoenix, Chicago fire officials said. The massive storm that dumped 10 inches of snow on some areas in the Midwest prompted the cancellation of nearly 1,000 flights at Chicago's airports. The average delay at O'Hare was nearly an hour Saturday afternoon.

Kansas Department of Transportation snowplow driver Stephen Windler, 25, died about 6 a.m. Saturday on U.S. Highway 69, according to the Wichita Eagle. A police crash report says his truck "traveled to the right, traversing the shoulder and drove into the grass" before it rolled over. Windler was thrown from the vehicle, which landed on top of him.

The storm moved Saturday toward the Northeast and New England. Some northern parts of New England could see up to 18 inches of snow.

In Nebraska, authorities closed Omaha's Eppley Airfield on Friday afternoon after a Southwest Airlines plane slid off an ice-slicked runway. No one was injured. The airfield later reopened.

The mayor of Wetumpka in central Alabama says a possible tornado caused significant damage to the city's downtown, with several buildings on the ground after an intense storm passed through the area. Mayor Jerry Willis said one injury was reported, but it wasn't serious, according to The Montgomery Advertiser.

Willis said a senior center and the police department were among the buildings damaged Saturday afternoon. Video from the scene showed several collapsed buildings, overturned cars and toppled trees and power lines.