WASHINGTON

Migrant numbers 'off

the charts,' chief says

The number of migrants apprehended at the Southern border topped 100,000 for the second month in a row as the Trump administration manages an ever-increasing number of Central American families streaming to the U.S. that hardline policies have failed to stem.

Border Patrol Chief Carla Provost told senators Wednesday that apprehension numbers were "off the charts," and she's had to divert agents to care for children.

"We cannot address this crisis by shifting more resources," Provost said. "It's like holding a bucket under a faucet. It doesn't matter how many buckets we have if we can't turn off the flow."

 

CARACAS, VENEZUELA

Opposition leader

in congress arrested

Security forces arrested the No. 2 leader of Venezuela's opposition-controlled congress Wednesday as President Nicolás Maduro's government began going after foes tied to a failed attempt to stir up a military uprising last week.

National Assembly Vice President Edgar Zambrano was leaving his Democratic Action party's headquarters when he was surprised by a commando unit from the feared SEBIN intelligence agency who surrounded his car.

A half-hour later, the officers towed the vehicle away with the lawmaker still inside, at the same time that Maduro was speaking live on state TV inaugurating an agricultural project.

 

WASHINGTON

FBI: Domestic terrorism

investigations top 850

The FBI has more than 850 open investigations into domestic terrorism across the country, and the threat continues to grow, top counterterrorism officials said Wednesday.

FBI, Justice Department and Homeland Security officials gave testimony before a congressional committee on homegrown hate and violence. They cautioned lawmakers they could not prosecute a white supremacist simply for the ideology or an online manifesto — there must be intent to harm or harass.

And much like foreign terrorists, domestic terrorists are radicalizing quickly online with few gateways or barriers and no need to meet up in person.

 

SACRAMENTO, CALIF.

November wildfires

costliest in state history 

Insurance claims have topped $12 billion for the November wildfires in California, making them the most expensive in state history.

The figure released Wednesday by Insurance Commissioner Ricardo Lara covers the fire that largely destroyed the town of Paradise and two Southern California blazes. It's up about $600 million from data released in January.

Most of the damages relate to the Paradise fire, which killed 85 people and destroyed nearly 19,000 buildings.

 

WARSAW, POLAND

Auschwitz museum

protests product line 

The Auschwitz Memorial and Museum has complained to an e-commerce site that was selling miniskirts, tote bags and other items printed with photos of the former Nazi German death camp where around 1.1 million people were killed during World War II.

The museum in Poland learned about the products offered on Australian e-commerce site Redbubble from people who saw them online, spokesman Bartosz Bartyzel said Wednesday. Employees were "shocked and outraged" over what they considered blatant dishonoring of Holocaust victims, he said.

 

FAWN RIVER TOWNSHIP, MICH.

9-year-old boy charged

with murdering mother

A 9-year-old boy has been charged with murder in the fatal shooting of his mother in their southern Michigan home, according to court documents.

The woman was found early Monday morning in Fawn River Township, St. Joseph County Prosecutor John McDonough told WWMT-TV . Fawn River Township is about 160 miles west-southwest of Detroit.

The boy also is charged with using a firearm during the commission of a felony.

 

HARRISBURG, PA.

Three Mile Island

nuclear plant to close

Three Mile Island, site of the United States' worst nuclear power accident, will begin a planned shutdown starting June 1 now that it is clear that it will not get a financial rescue from Pennsylvania, its owner said Wednesday.

Exelon Corp.'s statement comes two years after the Chicago-based energy giant threatened to close the money-losing plant without what critics have called a bailout.

The fight over Three Mile Island and Pennsylvania's four other nuclear power plants invigorated a debate over the "zero carbon emissions" characteristics of nuclear power in the age of global warming and in one of the nation's largest fossil fuel-producing states.

 

Beacon Journal/Ohio.com wires