CYBERSECURITY

Hackers exploit flaw

in WhatsApp software

Spyware crafted by a sophisticated group of hackers-for-hire took advantage of a flaw in the popular WhatsApp communications program to remotely hijack dozens of phones without any user interaction.

The Financial Times identified the hacking group as Israel's NSO Group, which has been widely condemned for selling surveillance tools to repressive governments.

WhatsApp, a Facebook subsidiary, has released a new version of the app containing a fix.

The spyware did not directly affect the end-to-end encryption that makes WhatsApp chats and calls private. It merely used a bug in the WhatsApp software as an infection vehicle.

Vulnerability found

in Intel's hardware

Intel has revealed another hardware security flaw that could affect millions of machines around the world.

The bug is embedded in the architecture of computer hardware, and it can't be fully fixed.

But Intel said Tuesday there's no evidence of anyone exploiting it outside of a research laboratory.

Intel said it's already addressed the problem in its newest chips after working for months with business partners and independent researchers.

ONLINE RETAIL

Walmart announces

next-day shipping

Walmart is rolling out free next-day delivery on its most popular items, increasing the stakes in the retail shipping wars with Amazon.

The nation's largest retailer said Tuesday it's been building a network of more efficient e-commerce distribution centers to make that happen. The next-day service will cover 220,000 popular items from diapers and nonperishable food items to toys and electronics. That's nearly double the number of items it carries in its stores.

Next-day delivery, which will require a minimum order of $35, will be available in Phoenix, Ariz., and Las Vegas on Tuesday. In coming days, it will expand to southern California. The discounter plans to roll out the service to 75 percent of the U.S. population by year-end. It will also be adding hundreds of thousands more products as the program expands.

AUTO PARTS

Mazda parts supplier

plans first US plant

A Japanese auto supplier is bringing its first U.S. facility to Huntsville to provide parts to the Mazda Toyota Manufacturing USA plant.

Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey said Tuesday the new supplier, DaikyoNishikawa US, will create 380 new jobs.

"For decades, Alabama has built strong relationships with many leading Japanese businesses, and I know that we will forge a productive, long-lasting partnership with DaikyoNishikawa," Ivey said in the announcement. "We're pleased that this world-class automotive supplier has selected our state for the site of its first U.S. manufacturing facility and look forward to seeing it put down roots in Sweet Home Alabama, where so many of our Japanese partners have found success."