INVESTING

Berkshire Hathaway

ramps up on Amazon

Billionaire Warren Buffett's company has been adding more Amazon shares to its investment cart.

Berkshire Hathaway said in filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Wednesday that it owned 537,300 Amazon shares at the end of June, up from 483,300 shares.

Buffett first revealed Berkshire Hathaway's stake in Amazon in May, although he said one of the company's two other investment managers made the pick.

Investors follow what Berkshire buys and sells closely because of Buffett's successful track record. Berkshire officials don't generally comment on these quarterly filings.

CREDIT

Data breach suspect

may have hacked widely

Federal prosecutors say a woman charged in a massive data breach at Capital One may have hacked more than 30 other organizations.

Paige Thompson of Seattle was arrested last month after the FBI said she obtained personal information from more than 100 million Capital One credit applications. There is no evidence the data was sold or distributed to others.

In a memorandum filed ahead of a detention hearing, rescheduled from Thursday to Aug. 22, the U.S. attorney's office in Seattle said servers found in Thompson's bedroom contained data stolen from more than 30 unnamed companies, educational institutions and other entities.

AUTOS

Ford announces recall

over safety belt design

Ford is recalling over 108,000 midsize cars in North America to fix a problem that could stop the safety belts from holding people in a crash.

The recall covers certain Ford Fusion and Lincoln MKZ cars from the 2015 model year. The company says the cars' front safety belt cables can lose strength due to heat buildup and may not adequately restrain passengers.

Ford says it's aware of one injury from the problem.

TRAVEL

Survey: 42% in America

skipping trips over costs

Americans, crippled by debt and seeing signs of a slowing economy, are sitting out on pricey vacations and everyday leisure activities.

A new Bankrate survey found 42% of Americans decided not to take a vacation over the past year because of the cost. Nearly a third said they can afford a vacation less now than they could have five years ago, though 26% said they can afford to do so more now. More than two-thirds of U.S. adults opted out of a recreational activity due to the cost at some point in the past year, the study found.

Half of respondents said the activities they passed on were too expensive to begin with or not a good value, while 43% said they didn't have enough money left over after paying everyday bills and 41% said they wanted to save money for other things.