Twisted meanings

It's troubling how right-leaning politicians twist the meaning of perfectly good words and use them to create fear of the left. During recent elections, for example, the right has tried to turn the electorate against the “liberal elite,” implying they are bad for the country in some way.

I ask, which of us wouldn't want an “elite” doctor if we were seriously ill? Which of us wouldn't want an “elite” quarterback for our team? Which of us hasn't dreamed of our kid getting into an “elite” college? So then, why don't we want smart people — elite thinkers — running our government? Well, of course, we do. We should be happy that some people are really good at what they do.

Now it is the word “socialism,” which is a word that can be defined in several ways: In the Communist sense of the word, it means that the government owns all property and controls the means of production.

But it can also mean that the government owns some property out of practicality, which it manages for the public good. Most of the world operates under this system, including the United States.

Don't believe it? Then think of our highways, water and sewer systems, fire and police departments, public health agencies, school systems and libraries, our national defense organizations, and so forth. All of it owned and managed by the government for the good of the people. Our country would be a miserable, 17th century backwater without a certain amount of socialism.

Political talk merits a certain amount of skepticism. Don't get played via a candidate's choice of words.

Jeff Davis, Akron

 

Omobien deserves vote

Linda Omobien is a valuable Akron City Council at-large member and is richly deserving of being re-elected. She will get my vote on May 7 and hopefully yours.

Sam Salem, Akron

 

Kilby always cared

Bruce Kilby was the councilman for our area a few years ago. That was before my neighborhood was gerrymandered. My neighbors and I were reassigned to a ward in a different part of the city.

For the years that Kilby represented us, he visited our neighborhood at least once a year, always returned my phone calls and generously gave his time to help with our problems and concerns.

We don’t have that kind of representation now.

I would love to have Kilby back as my councilman. He was the last good councilman that my neighborhood has seen. He was accessible and he got things done.

If he ever runs in my ward, he will have my vote.

Linda Belair, Akron

 

Memory loss

President Trump has told us several times that he has a great memory. Yet he told Robert Mueller more than 30 times he had no recollection of events that transpired during his presidency.

The American public, however, does remember all the promises he made that have not materialize. Still waiting for his new health care plan? Whatever happened to those “fantastic people” he hired, who were either indicted or walked away?

So far no one has seen a check from Mexico to build his imaginary wall. His new friend from North Korea has begun launching rockets again. His promise to make America great again has morphed into a nation totally polarized. The only memory he seems to recall is the one about destroying anything President Obama put in place.

We have a binary choice here. We can accept that his memory is shot, or accept that truth is not important to him. Either way he needs to go.

Kenneth Owen, Twinsburg