Major League Baseball's 150th anniversary logo features the silhouetted batter created for the 1969 celebration of the first professional baseball team.

MLB released the design Tuesday. Players, managers and coaches will wear a 3-by-2-inch patch on their right sleeves of a batter in white prepared to hit a white ball, with a blue background in front of the batter and red behind. "MLB" appears to the left of the logo and "150" to the right. The patch is more horizontal than the ones used for the 100th and 125th anniversaries.

The 1969 logo, designed by Jerry Dior of Sandgren & Murtha, had a white border and "100TH ANNIVERSARY" below in red. The logo became MLB's official mark as the commissioner's office took a more prominent role in the American and National leagues. The logo was put on the backs of caps starting in 1993 and the back of jersey necks in 2000, according to Uni Watch.

The 1994 logo changed the batter and ball to gold, had "125th ANNIVERSARY" below and was surrounded by a gold and black border. This year's patch has darker colors to match the American flag: Pantone 193 red and 282 navy. Last year's logo was Panatone 199 red and 288 blue.

MLB said the 150th anniversary patch also will be on caps for March 28 openers.

Tanaka isn't DH fan

Masahiro Tanaka wants to keep on hitting and running the bases at National League ballparks, hoping use of the designated hitter does not spread to the NL.

The New York Yankees pitcher missed a month last season after hurting both hamstrings while running the bases during a June 8 game at the New York Mets.

The players' association has proposed extending the DH to the NL, a plan baseball Commissioner Rob Manfred says is too complex to consider for this year.

"I did get injured, but when you look at it, I grew up where baseball was played by nine guys, meaning basically the pitcher would hit also, and I really enjoyed that baseball," Tanaka said Tuesday through a translator at New York's spring training complex.

Roster move

Outfielder Eric Young Jr. has agreed to a minor-league contract with the Baltimore Orioles and will report to major league spring training.

Young, 33, hit .202 with one home run and eight RBI in 41 games for the Los Angeles Angels last year.

Young has a .245 average in 10 big-league seasons with Colorado, the New York Yankees, New York Mets, Atlanta and the Angels and Atlanta. He led the NL with 46 stolen bases in 2013.