COLUMBUS — The final horn had sounded, and the deepest postseason run in Blue Jackets history had ended. Gathered at one end of the ice, the players looked around Nationwide Arena and took in applause from those who stayed.

Some of them, such as goaltender Sergei Bobrovsky and forward Artemi Panarin, waved. Whether those were gestures of thanks or public goodbyes will be clear in the coming weeks, as both unrestricted free agents said after Monday’s 3-0 loss to the Boston Bruins that their futures are unknown and that it was too early to speculate on what might come next.

“I don’t think about that future right now," Bobrovsky said during a six-minute news conference. "I’m just saying how I feel right now. It’s too early to discuss about my future."

A two-time Vezina Trophy winner, Bobrovsky has spent seven seasons with the Blue Jackets while developing into one of the NHL's premier goaltenders. After struggling in two prior postseason appearances, Bobrovsky shined this season, posting a .932 save percentage in a first-round sweep of the Tampa Bay Lightning.

In the process, coach John Tortorella said he thought Bobrovsky was “giving the middle finger” to those who had doubted he could be an elite postseason goalie.

He spent the final moments on the bench between David Savard and Dean Kukan. Nick Foligno gave him a hug after the final horn, but he didn’t want to say that he was appreciating what might have been his final curtain call at Nationwide Arena.

“Let’s see what’s going to happen,” he said. “I don’t want to throw the words. They’re big words. I want to rest. I want to settle things down and get good rest and make a right decision.

“I have to weigh everything, every opportunity. I have to speak with more people to scale everything and make a decision. It’s a big decision. It’s a lifetime decision and I don’t want to stand here and discuss about that right now after we lost this game.”

Panarin, in his second season with the Jackets, tied for the team lead with five postseason goals. He answered questions through an interpreter, Anton Poltyrev.

“We just lost the game,” he said. “That’s all I think.”

Would he return?

“Nobody knows,” he said in English.

Mostly in the past tense, Bobrovsky spoke of his pride in helping take a team that was happy just to reach the postseason to a point where it expected to make a deep playoff run this season. And he repeatedly thanked the fans for their support.

The team’s third marquee unrestricted free agent, forward Matt Duchene, was not available for interviews immediately after the game. He tied Panarin for the lead with five playoff goals.

For this night, at least, they all remained teammates.

“We went through some good times, some tough times,” Bobrovsky said. “We’ve been together seven years, so that’s a long time. It was special.”